Archives for posts with tag: letterforms

Oh, experimental typography… how we love thee. Perhaps it’s a case of design envy, or we’re just taken with pretty things in general, but when done well, experimental typography can stand on its own, out of context. This is definitely the case with the work of Hamburg, Germany-based motion designer/illustrator Alex Schlegel. Schlegel’s visual explorations on the typographic treatment for DirecTV’s Super Saturday Night lead to these impressive pieces. The forms, lighting, and textures achieved with Maxon Cinema 4D are not only purposeful but also beautiful. Designers can sometimes use such powerful tools gratuitously, but Schlegel’s steady hand and keen eye for composition and color elevate this client job for corporate giant AT&T to works of art.

Via Behance

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We have a thing for series, as you might have noticed from many of our posts. And serial projects, in which artists produce artwork for a specified stretch of time, whether it be daily or weekly or monthly, are some of our favorites (here and here and here). We recently stumbled upon 36 Days of Type, a yearly open call inviting designers, illustrators and visual artists to share their view on the letters and numbers from our alphabet. Originally conceived by Barcelona-based designers Nina Sans and Rafa Goicoechea, this creative initiative has literally generated tens of thousands of entries, and is now in its third year. The work of Belgian designer Mario De Meyer caught our eye, and led us to a virtual treasure trove of typographic wonders. For the 2016 edition, De Meyer dove head first into his varying letterforms, producing a variety of beautiful designs, each worthy of standing on its own. De Meyer’s imagination seems boundless, integrating depth and a terrific sense of color into his compositions. We’re looking forward to seeing what De Meyer whips up for 2017!

Via Behance and 36daysoftype.com

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We love alphabet-based typography work (here and here), and artwork from everyday objects (here and here), so we are naturally drawn to this series, STRUCTURE x Type, by Indian design student Rigved Sathe. With form and structure in mind, Sathe created each individual letter from an object (or objects) corresponding to the letter. We love his use of subtle details, from the ghosted letter in the background, to the objects very subtly peeking in from all sides of the perimeter. Sathe has a terrific sense of composition, and his letterforms are quite unique. It’s amazing how typographic explorations of the alphabet itself never get old, and we’re very fond of this talented student’s take.

Via Behance

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So, we stumbled upon this viral video recently, and were in complete awe. You will be too, if you haven’t seen it already, guaranteed. It made us ponder the irony of being so taken with corporate logos carefully drawn by hand, even though that’s exactly how they were developed in the not so distant past. It’s no wonder this video has circulated so rapidly… we live and design in a time when doing things without the use of a computer is such a novelty. Armed with little more than some calligraphy pens, London-based Seb Lester, a trained graphic designer with a penchant for calligraphy, miraculously recreates distinct and recognizable complex letterforms with complete ease and surprising accuracy. Sit back snd marvel, as these logos seem to just emerge from his steady hand. We bow down to Lester and his tremendous talents.

Compilation video below, plus a few of our other favorites follow. Can you guess what’s about to materialize as he starts each logo?

Keep up with Lester and all of his hand drawn logos on his various social media channels: Instagram, Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube, Twitter

Via seblester.com and Vimeo

More doodling.

A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

Harry Potter

A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

I doodle a lot.

A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

Latest doodle

A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

News doodle

A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

Let’s face it, emojis have infiltrated the general consciousness. When your mom is using them, you know they’ve hit the mainstream. These small digital images used to express an idea, emotion, etc., in electronic communication are now becoming the subject of art itself, which is another touchstone of cultural proliferation. Wildly talented Toronto-based letterer/designer/artist Christopher Rouleau has created a typographic set of letterforms using these tiny icons in fantastic ways. They are not simply cobbled together haphazardly, but thoughtfully constructed to reveal a variety of nuances in unexpected ways. For one, the emojis used start with the letter they are creating. We love Rouleau’s out-of-the-box thinking. He rolled out the set, one-by-one via his Instagram recently. Rouleau is no one hit wonder… be sure to check out his body of terrific work here.

Via Instagram

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Type geeks rejoice! We love inventive type, like this stellar work by Madrid-based art director/designer Andrés Momó. Fittingly for “DASHAPE” sneaker event in Spain, Momó literally threaded sneaker laces in the shape of letters to form the title of the event. The care he took with the letterforms shows. And somehow, this just wouldn’t be the same if it was digitally rendered… Momó taking the time to create this the old school way gets major props in our book.

Via Behance

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The shipping season has been hitting its peak over the past few days, so we thought it appropriate to share the typographic explorations of Barcelona-based design studio Lo Siento (previous post here). Among their highly creative undertakings are works in which they experiment with injecting colored liquid into individual pouches of plastic bubble wrap to form typographic figures. And these projects represent a larger theme in Lo Siento’s work: tangible typography. They are so in touch (no pun intended) with the nuances of letterforms, that they’re able to transfer that heightened awareness into physical objects, which is pretty astounding. We are sort of desensitized to design in some ways with advances in computer generated graphics, but when work like this comes along, it really catches our eye. Other works of Lo Siento’s include hand-formed muselet typography, cardboard typographic “skeleton”, and 4D letters, among many others. They are masters, and we really admire their work.

Via losiento.net

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Who says typography has to be pristine? Sometimes rough, fractured figures fit the bill. And we love this three-dimensional typeface from Auckland, New Zealand-based designer Scott Wheeler. The self-taught Wheeler designed these splendidly shattered letterforms as a self initiated project, but we’d like to see them applied out in the world because they’re too good not to. Though each figure is meant to be imperfect, we appreciate Wheeler’s attention to detail, like the subtle reflections and shadows. These fragmented forms really come together. Well done.

Via Behance

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Australian-born, Boston-based designer Dan Fleming has a very keen sense of typography and form. In this series, Word Animals, Flemming pushes the boundaries of letterforms to achieve illustrative representations of animals using the letters in their names. Some certainly work better than others, but we love the series as a whole. Licensing the designs to a kids’ clothing company wouldn’t be a bad idea… seems like the perfect audience for these fun, thoughtful designs. Vaguely reminiscent of another set of animal illustrations (here).

Via danflemingdesign.com

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The typographic stylings of Australian illustrator/designer Christopher Haines are on point. We love his fresh take on this set letterforms from A to Z. This alphabet sort of evolves and shape shifts, from swooshy distortion of the letter C to the sneaker-inspired letter M to the full-on venomous viper wrapped around the letter W. Haines clearly draws inspiration from sports, and has a great attention to detail, thoughtfully building each form that could stand on its own.

Via Instagram

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