Archives for posts with tag: lettering

Given all the snow in the news lately, we thought it fitting to peek at the work of street artist simply known as Faust. Paying homage to a favorite pastime for most who have grown up with even semi-snowy winters, he brings his impeccable calligraphy skills to snow-covered surfaces in a series he calls Snow Script. Faust fuels that childlike urge to run his fingers through the snow by stealthily adorning surfaces after a fresh snowfall with his stellar typography, then documenting it. Be sure to check out the rest of his killer work for an impressive roster of clients, including a mural just a stone’s throw away from our Rochester studio (photos below).

Not exactly the same, but vaguely reminiscent post here

Via Behance

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Given the late breaking, historical news that a NASA probe, launched some nine and a half years ago, and traveling an astounding 3 billion miles, has finally reached Pluto just hours ago, we thought it fitting to showcase this series of custom astronomy logos by Berlin-based designer Jonas Söder. We love Söder’s style here, sort of giving a nod to sci-fi graphics of the 1950s, but with a modern twist. His use of texture is quite nice, with a clear typographical prowess, as demonstrated by his custom letterforms. Out of this world, indeed.

Via Behance

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A couple members of the Barbour team had the honor of witnessing a speaking engagement by the incomparable Dana Tanamachi at Create Upstate in Syracuse last week. The event itself was terrific, from the impressive venue (great food, btw), awesome vendors, and stellar lineup of speakers. One highlight was undoubtedly the inspirational work and philosophy of Tanamachi. Honestly, we’re not saying anything new here, just bowing down, as most who are exposed to her transcendent work tend to do. Texas-bred, Brooklyn-based Tanamachi, whose lettering work is quite ubiquitous (you’ve probably seen it, or a rip-off of it, and may not have realized it was hers), seems quite gracious, humble, passionate and sincere when discussing her craft. She’s not some Brooklyn hipster who is too cool for school. Her tremendous talents seemed to have emerged over time, and her rise in the design world happened organically, which we truly admire. Tanamachi is a rock star among our peers, and we are just happy to have spent an engaging hour in her presence. Here’s a small sampling of her formidable body of work… prepare to drool.

Via tanamachistudio.com

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Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

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It is said that patience is a virtue. And French artists/designers Xavier Casalta and Rémy Boiré are just oozing with it. Casalta’s specialty is pointillism, a technique in which small, distinct dots are applied in patterns to form an image. Boiré is a masterful hand-letterer, whose line work is impeccable. Together they created this phenomenal piece. Clocking in over 300 hours of patience and discipline, Casalta’s and Boiré’s passion for highly detailed design could not be more evident. Not only is this a great example of seamless collaboration, but also of deliberate forethought and planning, as well as hand craftsmanship in an increasingly digital design landscape. Just incredible.

Via casaltaxavier.com and remyboire.fr

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We often focus on a single project or series, but the growing body of work by Kyle Wilkeson is just too good not to share. Wilkeson, Yorkshire, England-based letterer/designer/creative director, is innately talented. Quite simply, his work is special. From experimental lettering of Pecha Kucha promotional materials, to the thoughtful typography of his ADC invitation, to his surprisingly elegant and graphic Phaeton Chair, Wilkeson is a young designer to watch.

Via kylewilkinson.co.uk

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