Archives for posts with tag: light painting

As technology advances, so too does our ability to track motion, as is exhibited by the iPhone, Fitbit, forthcoming Apple Watch, and others. But Canadian Stephen Orlando is more fixated with the beauty of motion, and innovative ways to capture it visually. Orlando, a mechanical engineer by trade, blurs the line between science and art in his stunning ongoing series Motion Exposure. By utilizing programmable LED lights and long exposure photography, Orlando is “able to tell the story of movement.” Though we’ve featured light painting before (here and here), Orlando’s work is a bit different. We love the spectrum of colors and intriguing patterns of motion he captures. In his own words, Orlando says “I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph…. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.” This growing series features motion captured by kayaking, canoeing, soccer, tennis, swimming and even waterfalls, and more. Absolutely beautiful.

Via motionexposure.com

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Arizona-based photographer Alex DeForest has a rather unique approach to portraiture. Though the medium of light painting is not a new one (can be traced back to American artist Man Ray’s 1935 series “Space Writing”), DeForest’s reclamation approach makes for some pretty remarkable pieces. In his own words, “I buy cheap flashlights at Walgreens, grocery stores, wherever. Often I buy fiber optic toys, disassemble them, and then connect them to flashlights to experiment. Occasionally I use pieces of acrylic and glass or even colored plastic handled cooking instruments.” The results are quite beautiful.

Via alexdeforest.wix.com and petapixel.com

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Finnish artist Janne Parviainen uses a really intriguing technique in his photography, that could easily be mistaken for fancy Photoshop work. But no post editing here… Parviainen traces patterns and shapes using light sources caught with a camera on a long exposure setting. “I have traced entire rooms with a single LED light with the exposure times ranging from 20 minutes to 37 minutes,” he says. Parviainen capitalizes on these eerie effects, with really compelling results.

Via jannepaint.wix.com

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