Archives for posts with tag: light

As technology advances, so too does our ability to track motion, as is exhibited by the iPhone, Fitbit, forthcoming Apple Watch, and others. But Canadian Stephen Orlando is more fixated with the beauty of motion, and innovative ways to capture it visually. Orlando, a mechanical engineer by trade, blurs the line between science and art in his stunning ongoing series Motion Exposure. By utilizing programmable LED lights and long exposure photography, Orlando is “able to tell the story of movement.” Though we’ve featured light painting before (here and here), Orlando’s work is a bit different. We love the spectrum of colors and intriguing patterns of motion he captures. In his own words, Orlando says “I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph…. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.” This growing series features motion captured by kayaking, canoeing, soccer, tennis, swimming and even waterfalls, and more. Absolutely beautiful.

Via motionexposure.com

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We are suckers for experimental typography, especially when it’s served up as a nice tidy alphabet. This outstanding series by Madrid-based designer Alejandro “Alex” López Becerro is one such example. Becerro is crazy talented, and his 3D work is on the mark. We love the variety that’s showcased here, which seems to be key to really successful avant-garde, if you will, alphabet work. His choice of textures and colors elevate this project. And we are particularly impressed with Becerro’s ability to establish a great sense of setting through light and shadow. Be sure to check out some of his other work, he’s a master at what he does.

More alphabet posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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There’s something to be said for good design (which sorta goes without saying since that is essentially the mantra of this very blog). When designers collaborate (even from different disciplines), special things happen… as is the case with this awesome lamp. The collection, which consists of several different colored lamps that project the celestial constellations of the Northern Hemisphere’s two equinoxes and solstices onto nearby walls and ceilings, was born from the collaboration between Hungarian graphic designer Anna Farkas and Hungarian interior designer Miklós Batisz. What originally began as an art piece by Farkas, the Starry Light collection is now for sale after almost a year of product development, and they are manufactured by hand. What a simple and special idea executed so beautifully.

Via starrylightlamps.com and anagraphic.hu

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Arizona-based photographer Alex DeForest has a rather unique approach to portraiture. Though the medium of light painting is not a new one (can be traced back to American artist Man Ray’s 1935 series “Space Writing”), DeForest’s reclamation approach makes for some pretty remarkable pieces. In his own words, “I buy cheap flashlights at Walgreens, grocery stores, wherever. Often I buy fiber optic toys, disassemble them, and then connect them to flashlights to experiment. Occasionally I use pieces of acrylic and glass or even colored plastic handled cooking instruments.” The results are quite beautiful.

Via alexdeforest.wix.com and petapixel.com

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German-born, California-based artist Andrew Myers experiments with light and shadow in his latest series, We Don’t Belong in the Shadows. These incredible portraits are composed of thousands of screws, wood, paint and phone book pages. Though we’re sure these photos don’t even do them justice, Myers’ masterful compositions are really something, carefully placing screws in such a way to reveal shadows around the contours of these faces. Be sure to also check out this video for a closer look.

Via andrewmyersart.com and Facebook

 

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Japanese born artist Kumi Yamashita is a true master of manipulating light and shadow. Her stunning work utilizes a single light source to bring each piece to life. Yamashita was commissioned by American Express to create an origami wall installation of portraits of 22 employees. And, more recently, her shadow work Untitled (Child) was featured in a Smithsonian Museum exhibit in Washington D.C., and now travels nationally and internationally. Also be sure to check out her Constellation portraits.

Via kumiyamashita.com

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