Archives for posts with tag: likeness

With financial matters on the minds of many around the world on the heals of our historic presidential election just one week ago, we thought it fitting to share this project by Georgian illustrator/designer Tatiana Trikoz. Commissioned by Swiss banking group Swissquote, Trikoz created these incredibly intricate currency portraits featuring some of the world’s most famous billionaires – Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson and Elon Musk. Trikoz seamlessly adheres to the look of the existing currency she aims to mimic… we are in awe of the stunning details. Perhaps our president-elect will commission her to imagine his likeness on U.S. currency in the near future? Crazier things have happened….

Via Behance

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We’ve seen the work of Malaysian artist/architect “Red” Hong Yi before (here), but we had to revisit her work again because it’s just so good. This time, in keeping with her penchant for food-related art, Hong Yi created a portrait of international action star Jackie Chan’s face from chopsticks… 64,000 chopsticks to be exact. Suspended in bundles of various sizes from a steel frame and when viewed from a distance, the chopsticks bear an unmistakable likeness to the instantly recognizable famous face of Chan. We really admire out-of-the-box thinking like Hong Yi’s here. We have a hard time even gauging the amount of time and planning that went into this… such a creative expression of a brilliantly inspired thinker.

Via redhongyi.com

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Family resemblance is a curious thing. When two immediate family members look so much alike, it can be jarring. North Carolina bred, Arizona based photographer Bobby Neel Adams capitalizes on this phenomenon of startling likeness in his stellar FamilyTree series. Adams captures portraits of two immediate family members (usually mother/daughter and father/son pairings) dressed and posed similarly. Rather than a tidy side-by-side composition, Adams tears them down the middle, then places two halves together. This technique works so well, both conceptual and aesthetically. Well done.

Via bobbyneeladams.com

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Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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