Archives for posts with tag: macrophotography

Romanian photographer Andrei Mogan has a thing for eyes. His fantastic series of macro shots, titled Look Into My Eyes, is quite beautiful, uncovering intricacies that otherwise go unnoticed. Mogan’s work is reminiscent of Your Beautiful Eyes series by Armenian photographer Suren Manvelyan. Andrei takes it a step further, however, by also photographing his subjects clutching prints of their eyes. We love this approach, it gives some context to the subject matter, and makes these shots that much more striking.

Via Facebook

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In much the same vein as the incredible work of Christopher Boffoli, Japanese artist/designer/art director, miniature photographer Tatsuya Tanaka’s playful take on macro photography is really memorable. Tanaka’s miniature dioramas, if you will, are almost like stepping into the mind of a young child, pushing his broccoli around the plate while his imagination runs wild. Tanaka says, “Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats. Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.” A key word here is everyday. Tanaka has actually committed himself to releasing one of these each day, a project aptly titled Miniature Calendar, and has been doing so since April 2011. Yes, everyday, folks. The body of work here is tremendous, and Tanaka’s perspective is fascinating. This is obviously just a very small sample of an incredible project that’s worth following. Just ask his impressive social media following: 35K on Facebook, 242K on Instagram, 88K on Twitter. Tanaka’s mission is simple: “It would be great if you could use it to add a little enjoyment to your everyday life.” We couldn’t agree more.

Via miniature-calendar.com

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We know, we know… on paper it sounds, well, boring. Photos of mushrooms. Big deal. That very simplistic description does not come close to realizing the majesty Australian photographer Steve Axford captures in his work. Axford is a sort of photography explorer, not only capturing the natural world around him, but also surveying remote locations by way of macro photography to uncover the beauty of mushrooms and other fungi. Nature photography is often concentrated on much larger objects, so Axford’s artistic approach to what could otherwise be missed, and considered scientific subjects is pretty unique. In his own words, “My photography is an avenue into exploring this world… as it slows me down and allows me to look at things more closely. My interests cover everything from micro fungi to volcanoes, though more of my time now is spent with the fungi than the volcanoes. While doing this I have developed a passion for the way things fit together (the ecology). Nothing exists in isolation and the more you look, the more connections you find. Oddly enough, this fits with what I used to work at, as a designer and manager of large computer systems. Although the world is a far more complex than any man made computer system, the rules learned with one can be applied to the other.” Needless to say, we appreciate the unique beauty and investigative spirit in Axford’s work.

More macro photography here and here.

Via steveaxford.smugmug.com

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There is tremendous beauty in nature, and even some not visible to the naked eye. Take grains of sand, for instance. Much like snowflakes, no two grains are alike. But Hawaii-based Dr. Gary Greenberg reveals a beautiful, colorful tapestry of tiny shells, coral fragments and weathered crystals through his magnified photographs. Greenberg, a former photographer and filmmaker who later earned his Ph.D. in biomedical research, invented and developed high-definition, three-dimensional light microscopes that make this sort of photography possible. His impressive sampling for this photographic series features grains from beaches around the world, which he magnifies up to 300 times to expose “hidden and unexpected aspects of nature.” In his own words, Greenberg explains that his mission is to “reveal the secret beauty of the microscopic landscape that makes up our everyday world.” And that “art is a doorway through which we can more deeply embrace nature.”

More extreme close-ups here and here.

Via sandgrains.com

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