Archives for posts with tag: magazine

Italian photographer Dan Bannino is a consummate storyteller with a particular penchant for still life and commercial photography. Much of his work could just as easily find a home on a gallery wall as in the pages of a mass market magazine, like National Geographic, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Cosmopolitan and many others. With his terrific Power and Food series, Bannino explores the eating habits of powerful and influential people from around the world. In our celebrity-obsessed culture any glimpse “behind the curtain,” so to speak, is valued. A look into the private lives of public figures, no matter how brief or inconsequential, makes us feel a little closer to them. Bannino’s series capitalizes on that curiosity, with his vibrant and arresting images. We particularly love his compositions and bold style. In his own words, Bannino states, “If you’re a fast food aficionado or a pizza freak, you have more in common with Mr. Donald J. Trump, and Pope Francis himself than you ever imagined. Check out some of the most unexpected food patterns of the world’s leaders, and you’ll never eat the same way again.”

Via danbannino.com

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The shipping season has been hitting its peak over the past few days, so we thought it appropriate to share the typographic explorations of Barcelona-based design studio Lo Siento (previous post here). Among their highly creative undertakings are works in which they experiment with injecting colored liquid into individual pouches of plastic bubble wrap to form typographic figures. And these projects represent a larger theme in Lo Siento’s work: tangible typography. They are so in touch (no pun intended) with the nuances of letterforms, that they’re able to transfer that heightened awareness into physical objects, which is pretty astounding. We are sort of desensitized to design in some ways with advances in computer generated graphics, but when work like this comes along, it really catches our eye. Other works of Lo Siento’s include hand-formed muselet typography, cardboard typographic “skeleton”, and 4D letters, among many others. They are masters, and we really admire their work.

Via losiento.net

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Creating an original typeface is no easy feat. And one that is animated, engaging and thematically relevant to the concept at hand? You guessed it… tremendously challenging. Madrid-based designer/art director Noelia Lozano has created one such design for a project entitled Curiosity is the Key. Lozano worked in collaboration with The Poool magazine, part of the OFFF Festival 2014, an international festival held in Barcelona every year that attracts offline/online designers, motion designers, thinkers, sound designers, graphic designers, theorists, developers, professionals, students (basically curious creative types). Noelia was given the magazine statement, along with the theme, and off she went: “We hate expectations. We are bigger than reality. We want to dive in what’s behind the real world. Dive deeper with what we want to know without expecting it. The Poool is the place to be, it is your escape, your answer, and the feeling of scratching your itchiness.” In her own words, Lozano explains: “My work is in relation to that which helps me to keep working every day …curiosity.”

Via noelialozano.com

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<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/95064983″>CURIOSITY IS THE KEY</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user4948198″>NOELIA LOZANO</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Paris-based, Israeli-born image-maker/photographer Ben Sandler creates more than just pretty pictures. Sandler’s work is conceptually driven, challenging the viewer with thoughtfully crafted visuals. We are really taken with the theme of dissection, which we’ve seen in some of his work. In “No Limit” Sandler was faced with the task by Amusement Magazine to envision what the future will be like with the rise of on-demand production by 3D printers. What could have been an overly futuristic Photoshop extravaganza is an impeccable exploded view of the anatomy of a wristwatch. And for an editorial story on the subject of human movement for the French publication, Blast Magazine, Sandler utilizes long exposure in some really compelling ways. More on the subject of disassembly here.

Via bensandler.com and Behance

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Dietlind Wolf is inherently creative. She seems to see the world around her a bit differently from the average person. This German visual multidisciplinary designer, prop-stylist and photographer’s eye for composition, color, texture is just exquisite. Her body of work really is something, but it would be impossible to feature it all here. We are particularly drawn to this series for German magazine Brigitte. We love the juxtaposition of sketchy illustration with prop styling. These could easily stand on their own. Be sure to check out all of her work, it’s like a masterclass.

Via dietlindwolf.blogspot.com

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When Clase Premier magazine, AeroMéxico’s first- and business-class in-flight magazine, decided to feature renowned Danish chef René Redzepi on its cover, one could never imagine the resulting brilliance. This amazing silhouette of Redzepi’s face was illustrated photographically by Mexican design studio Golpeavisa, “by shooting a bunch of cuisine and kitchen related elements in perspective.” This clearly involved a great vision and lots of planning. Be sure to check out the video below for a behind-the-scenes look.

Via Behance

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