Archives for posts with tag: mask

Using toilet paper rolls in craft projects is pretty common in the elementary school set. But not so much in the art world. Paris-based sculptor/paper artist Junior Fritz Jacquet defies convention with these remarkably expressive masks. Each made from a single toilet paper roll masterfully manipulated by Jacquet, this set of 40 masks is really something to behold. Inspired by the traditional art of origami, Jacquet sculpts the cardboard by hand, then applies pigment and shellac. Just terrific.

Via juniorfritzjacquet.com and matthieugauchet.fr

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With all this fingerprint/Touch ID talk lately, we thought it fitting to take a closer look at some amusing artwork by an Italian artist who goes by the name “Dito Von Tease” (“dito” translates to “finger” in Italian, and is a reference to Dita Von Teese, the famous icon of “burlesque” style and expert in disguises). What started as a simple avatar for his Facebook page has evolved into this amusing and fascinating project that has really caught on (it was featured on the Today Show and there’s even an iPhone app). The philosophy behind the project may seem sort of highbrow, but the whole thing looks like just plain fun. “Dito” explains: “The Ditology-project wants to invite everybody to look beyond the “masks” we use in playing our lives and to go deep to find our unique “fingerprint”. In the “digital age” (digitus is Latin for finger) the finger is the “tool” we use in our touch-screens, mouse pads and keyboard. Thus everybody is “hidden behind his finger” while surfing the internet and especially in social networks.”

Via Blogspot

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Young, French artist Charlotte Caron works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, engraving and photography. Her series of painted portraits is particularly captivating. This unique execution involves painting animal faces over photographed human forms, and serves as commentary about the complexity of human nature, and being part civilized and part wild. Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, and also describes this hybrid approach in her own words: “We are both tempted by the humanization of animals, which often reveals our fantasy projections and the bestial men, another way for us to freeze the other in a animality.” “This series of paintings, photographs, tries to give an answer to a form of duality – that assumes an animal part. By the medium of painting in addition, flow, mask, portrait to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums, so between the animal and the portrait.”

Via charlottecaron.fr

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