Archives for posts with tag: master

Photo manipulation, we’re talking done really well, is a skill unto itself. With the proliferation of Photoshop use, the average viewer seems to take manipulated photos for granted these days. Photo manipulation software is literally everywhere, including on cheap or even free apps on phones in people’s pockets. But the upper crust of Photoshop users still have it on lockdown, and we take notice when we see greatness. Enter Australia-based photographer/designer Anthony Hearsey. He takes on a variety of clients and projects, but it’s these beautifully surreal images that caught our attention. Hearsey’s work is seamless, allowing his twisted concepts to really shine. We will surely continue to follow him and look forward to seeing what he comes up with next.

Via Behance

hearsey-01 hearsey-02 hearsey-03 hearsey-04 hearsey-05 hearsey-06 hearsey-07 hearsey-08 hearsey-09 hearsey-10 hearsey-11

Welp, UK designer/illustrator/artist Christopher LaBrooy has done it again. His mad CGI skills continue to amaze us. LaBrooy is a master manipulator, creating surreal digital compositions that defy logic and reason (previous posts here and here). Aptly titled simply 911, and set in what appears to be picturesque Palm Springs, LaBrooy pays homage to the iconic 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS in this incredible series. What we love most about LaBrooy’s work is that he elevates his adeptness in Maxon Cinema 4D beyond gratuitous rendering for the sake of rendering, to thoughtful and awe-inspiring artwork. Gearheads may shudder at the sight of a dozen otherwise pristine Porches partially submerged in a pool, but that’s precisely what LaBrooy seems to strive for: an emotional response to his digital work. As far as we’re concerned, mission accomplished (again).

Via chrislabrooy.com

labrooy-01 labrooy-02 labrooy-03 labrooy-04

One mint Porsche 911 Carrera RS #porsche #porsche911 #bendy #animation

A post shared by Chris Labrooy (@chrislabrooy) on

labrooy-05 labrooy-06

Pointillism, a painting technique in which distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image, dates back some 130 years, though the technique is actually analogous to four-color CMYK printing process and RGB displays we designers are all too familiar with. Some of the most notable artists who have employed this technique are van Gogh and Seurat, but the art movement was relatively brief. But contemporary South African artist Gavin Rain makes a great case for bringing it back. Rain seems to have mastered the complex technique, as exhibited in his stellar body of work. In his own words, Rain explains that he developed his style “from the need to tell a story – to present a perspective. I usually dislike art that doesn’t communicate anything. I also hate it when I’m viewing art and I don’t know the message. I wanted to avoid that – everyone has to get my message – which is to step back.” We imagine Rain’s layering process takes quite some time, but the result is absolutely breathtaking. His unique perspective, and ability for visual conveyance, is just incredible.

Via gavinrain.com

rain-01 rain-02 rain-03 rain-04 rain-05 rain-06 rain-07 rain-08 rain-09 rain-10 rain-11

Italian illustrator/designer Alberto Seveso employs some awesome Photoshop skills to merge contrasting textures for a very distinct design style. We’ve featured his work before, but had to share some of his latest work. From album artwork, to packaging for Adobe, Seveso is a true master of digital art. He brings a certain beauty and elegance to the medium. Incredible design inspiration.

Via burdu976.com

Seveso-01 Seveso-02 Seveso-03 Seveso-04 Seveso-05 Seveso-06 Seveso-07 Seveso-08 Seveso-09 Seveso-10 Seveso-11 Seveso-12 Seveso-13 Seveso-14 Seveso-15 Seveso-16 Seveso-17 Seveso-18

%d bloggers like this: