Archives for posts with tag: metaphor

Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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If you were thinking of invading any given place, the use of balloons would not likely be involved. Unless, of course, you’re an artist with a statement to make. Such is the case with French photographer/artist Charles Pétillon and his “Invasions” series. Pétillon uses white balloons of varying sizes as a way to “change the point of view that we encounter every day without regard to it. It is our view that I try to sharpen and to move from a practical perception to visual emotion.” Pétillon essentially fills spaces, both architectural and natural, with said balloons. The resulting visuals become metaphors for various themes. The house overflowing with balloons, for example, is a metaphor for family memories that spring from home. Pétillon says, “The white balloons symbolizing childhood naivety. This metaphor allows to ask us about family memory. How is it spread? Is it a universal need?” Other pieces in this visually arresting series include “Play Station 2,” a basketball net symbolizing the video game universe, and “Mutation 2” DNA structure symbolizing genetic modification. It must have been quite a feat handling such a massive amount of balloons, and still making them look quite beautiful and surreal.

Via charlespetillon.com

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Snakes get a bad rap. And they have throughout history. Perhaps it’s their cold-blooded, slithering and hissing disposition, but snakes have long been feared and associated with evil. London-based photographer Andrew McGibbon attempts to change that perception with his compelling series, cleverly named Slitherstition. By photographing his serpentine subjects from overhead and on brightly colored backgrounds, McGibbon is able to capture them in a vulnerable state, and emphasize their inherent beauty and grace. McGibbon has a terrific sense of color, paring the reptiles with interesting, vivid background colors to compliment their almost graphic exteriors. McGibbon is also quite the articulate wordsmith, explaining this project in more depth: “While a great many species of animals are subject to projections of man’s metaphorical thinking, I don’t see another – not even venomous counterparts, like spiders or scorpions; or sharks which hide in murky depths, waiting (as the horror movies have us think) to rip us apart, which is thought of as so deadly and demonic. The snake is insidious, while the serpent is all-mighty and terrifying. From ancient symbols to pop culture and schlock horror, from Medusa to Freud, the snake is a single unifier, a common enemy unanimously held in hideous regard – it is, everyone agrees, evil. These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look, beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.”

Another snake-related post here.

Via andrewmcgibbon.co

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We really like the commitment of promising young UK designer Thomas Wightman. Showcased here are two school projects by the recent grad. That’s right, school projects. Wightman aimed high with these tremendously conceptual sculptures, and executed them with perfection. The intricate details are truly astounding. The objective of the assignments (aptly titled The Medium is the Message) was to visually interpret a theme (Wightman chose addiction, with a focus on obsessive driven addictions) through a chosen medium. In his own words, Wightman explains the medium he selected and the meaning behind his first piece: “The book firstly is closed hiding the addiction from view in the same manner as those who hide these addictions from loved ones and friends. However when the book is opened it reveals the chaotic emotions felt. Panic attacks are heavily associated with Obsessive Compulsive disorder and I wanted to convey this through the metaphor of a sinking ship in a vortex drowning from the obsession. Also the symptoms of a panic attack include loss of breath in the same way as drowning in water. However I wanted to add the anchor and typographic rope showing these problems can be solved and the ship can be saved in the same way as those who suffer from OCD when they receive proper treatment.”

For his second book sculpture, Plagued by Doubt, Wightman delved a little deeper into the emotion associated with living with OCD. Wightman explains: “I wanted to convey this idea by making a plague of insects. I decided on moths because I wanted to suggest that the book has been hidden and left, and the moths have eaten away at the pages of the book. This shows that if you don’t seek treatment for OCD, it can become both physically and mentally damaging. Also, typography was used to show the idea that these moths have made a nest within the book – representative of the fact that OCD is usually with a person for life. It lives within and is not noticed until the book is opened, releasing the moths and solving the problem to demonstrate that with proper help, OCD can be treated.” Conceptually and aesthetically beautiful.

More book-related posts here and here and here.

Via Blogspot

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Russian-born surrealist painter and sculptor Vladimir Kush sees the world from a very unique perspective, and shares that vision with the world through his extraordinary work. We can’t help but compare these fascinating (and sometimes perplexing) visions to the work of Salvador Dalí. Although his style is often described as surrealist, Kush himself refers to it as “metaphorical realism”, as he describes in his credo: “Any metaphor has its own story to tell. Metaphor “sees” through centuries, unveiling the images of the world and connecting notions created by civilization. At the same time, metaphor can easily reflect the complexities of our modern life, with its ambiguity and contradictions. The painter’s mission is to find a metaphorical “parallel” for every side of real life. The element of unexpectedness will shake up the viewer and awaken his artistic nature.” Such unexpectedness abounds in Kush’s work… we find ourselves making new discoveries each time we look.

Via vladimirkush.com

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