Archives for posts with tag: meticulous

UK photographer/artist Caroline South has an eye for color, order, and harmony. We have no idea what her home life is like, but if her truly satisfying work is any indication, we imagine it to be a utopia of tidy arrangements by color. We’ve said it before (here and here and here)… order (as in sequence, categorization, systemization) is innately pleasing to the human brain. And South hits our brains from all sides with her meticulous photographs, often composed of found objects from regular beachcombing. From ombre to rainbow order, South’s keen eye for both color and composition is at the heart of her work. For those suffering from color OCD, has South got the fix for you!

Via carolinesouth.co and Instagram

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Indonesia-based artist/photographer/designer Romo Jack, otherwise known by the handle @ponypork, gives new meaning to working with one’s hands. Jack, a 20-something savvy social media maven, dreams up a variety of otherwise mundane activities, such as cooking, ironing, painting, drawing, playing music, playing sports, and even photographing, and captures them from an aerial point of view. Jack’s terrific compositions all have two things in common: his signature elaborately tattooed forearms as a subject, and a (very deliberately) Instagram-friendly square canvas. We appreciate Jack’s attention to detail and meticulous crafting of each image. We’re excited to see how this fantastic series, #whatmyhandsdoing, evolves in the future. And his ever-growing base of almost 33,000 Instagram followers undoubtedly feels the same.

Via Instagram

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Collage is often thought of as an amalgamation of different materials. But for Brooklyn-based artist Mark Wagner, his ongoing collage work is almost always comprised of a single material: one dollar bills. But to simply refer to what he creates as collages probably doesn’t do them justice. Wagner’s work is extremely intricate and meticulous; he gives purpose to the placement of each shred of currency. We don’t doubt that whatever the material, Wagner could compose a masterpiece beyond our wildest imagination. But part of the intrigue here is certainly the taboo nature of destroying dollar bills. In his own words, Wagner discusses his choice of material: “The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.”

Be sure to also check out the terrific process video below.

Via markwagnerinc.com

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Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park is a bit of a perfectionist. His highly intricate work with wire mesh is breathtaking, and these photos probably don’t even do them justice. The videos convey the level of detail much better, but the process is best described as planes of wire mesh spaced several inches apart, over which Park superimposes a subject via a projector, then slowly prunes to reveal a stunning portrait. Beautiful and compelling work like nothing we’ve ever seen.

Via seungmopark.com and YouTube

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