Archives for posts with tag: Michael Jackson

Believe it or not, for being such a simple, uncomplicated product, Lego has some particularly clever and thought-provoking advertisements (here and here). Already three years old, this campaign celebrating 55 years of the Lego brand is basically a series of 55 visual riddles, fittingly featuring little more than the iconic bricks. The great minds at Swiss agency Cavalcade are behind these fantastically clever designs, which, much like Legos themselves, inspire a great deal of imagination. We must admit, we’re still struggling to solve many of these, but it’s so satisfying having solved the ones we did. Answer key to the few ads featured here at the bottom of this post. No peeking, try to figure them out for yourself!

Via Behance

cavalcade-01 cavalcade-02 cavalcade-03 cavalcade-04 cavalcade-05 cavalcade-06 cavalcade-07 cavalcade-08 cavalcade-09 cavalcade-10 cavalcade-11 cavalcade-12 cavalcade-13 cavalcade-14 cavalcade-15 cavalcade-16 cavalcade-17 cavalcade-18 cavalcade-19 cavalcade-20 cavalcade-21 cavalcade-22

Answers (in order of images): Yellow Submarine, Alice in Wonderland, Three Little Pigs, Purple Rain, Jaws, Spider-Man, The White Stripes, Hunger Games, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Jackson 5, King Kong, Titanic, Stairway to Heaven, I Walk the Line, The Beatles, New Kids on the Block, Little Red Riding Hood, Clockwork Orange, Men in Black, Rolling Stones

Advertisements

Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

ButcherBilly-01A ButcherBilly-01B ButcherBilly-02 ButcherBilly-03 ButcherBilly-04 ButcherBilly-05 ButcherBilly-06 ButcherBilly-07 ButcherBilly-08 ButcherBilly-09 ButcherBilly-10 ButcherBilly-11 ButcherBilly-12 ButcherBilly-13 ButcherBilly-14 ButcherBilly-15 ButcherBilly-16 ButcherBilly-17 ButcherBilly-18 ButcherBilly-19 ButcherBilly-20 ButcherBilly-21 ButcherBilly-22 ButcherBilly-23 ButcherBilly-24 ButcherBilly-25 ButcherBilly-26 ButcherBilly-27

Nostalgia is a prominent theme in art and design… simply a reflection of the human experience and human nature in general. We’ve seen it take many forms time and time again. Our latest find is a “bit” unexpected (no pun intended). Taking larger-than-life personas of rap and hip-hop artists, and minimizing them into pixelated 8-bit graphics may seem counterintuitive in this age of lifelike 3D avatars and such. But curiously enough, it works. This ever-growing collection of 8-bit characters is the brainchild of young UK artist A.Mulli (aka Adam Mulligan). A.Mulli’s low-res portraits pay homage to vintage arcade games like Street Fighter and Donkey Kong, imagining current hip-hop artists and rappers and other famous figures through the lens of a 1980s arcade character. Below are a few of our favorites. Keep ‘em coming, A.Mulli!

Via Instagram

AMulli-01 AMulli-02 AMulli-03 AMulli-04 AMulli-05 AMulli-06 AMulli-07 AMulli-08 AMulli-09 AMulli-10 AMulli-11 AMulli-12 AMulli-13 AMulli-14 AMulli-15 AMulli-16 AMulli-17 AMulli-18 AMulli-19 AMulli-20 AMulli-21 AMulli-22

California-based artist and teacher Russell Powell gives new meaning to the term “hand painted.” Inspiring his young students and tens of thousands of Instagram followers, Powell has mastered the art of hand stamping, which is way more difficult than it sounds. We’re not talking elementary finger painting… Powell operates on a much higher artistic level. In short, he expertly paints (usually a portrait) on the palm of his hand, but does so rather quickly so it doesn’t dry. Then transfers it to paper or some other surface for preservation. It really is brilliant, and executed masterfully by Powell. Saying nothing of his stellar painting skills, conceptually it just works so well. The inevitable prints of his fingers and palm become an integral part of his work, making every single piece truly unique. One word: badass.

Via Instagram

Powell-01

Powell-02

Powell-03

Powell-04 Powell-05

Powell-06 Powell-07

Powell-08

Powell-09 Powell-10

Powell-11 Powell-12 Powell-13 Powell-14 Powell-15 Powell-16

Powell-17 Powell-18 Powell-19 Powell-20

Yes, we are suckers for series, and we especially love this one. Brazilian designer/illustrator Frederico Birchal depicts famous figures from music, movies and television with just costumes. Birchal’s attention to detail really elevates this series. Awesome concept, excellent execution. Well done!

Via Behance

Birchal-01 Birchal-02 Birchal-03 Birchal-04 Birchal-05 Birchal-06 Birchal-07 Birchal-08 Birchal-09 Birchal-10 Birchal-11 Birchal-12 Birchal-13 Birchal-14 Birchal-15 Birchal-16

%d bloggers like this: