Archives for posts with tag: microscope

There is tremendous beauty in nature, and even some not visible to the naked eye. Take grains of sand, for instance. Much like snowflakes, no two grains are alike. But Hawaii-based Dr. Gary Greenberg reveals a beautiful, colorful tapestry of tiny shells, coral fragments and weathered crystals through his magnified photographs. Greenberg, a former photographer and filmmaker who later earned his Ph.D. in biomedical research, invented and developed high-definition, three-dimensional light microscopes that make this sort of photography possible. His impressive sampling for this photographic series features grains from beaches around the world, which he magnifies up to 300 times to expose “hidden and unexpected aspects of nature.” In his own words, Greenberg explains that his mission is to “reveal the secret beauty of the microscopic landscape that makes up our everyday world.” And that “art is a doorway through which we can more deeply embrace nature.”

More extreme close-ups here and here.

Via sandgrains.com

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Word of this amazingly tiny tome broke this week, and we are fascinated. University of Iowa librarian Colleen Theisen recently stumbled upon the microscopic book, measuring just 0.138 inches square and 0.04 inches thick. Luckily the library, which houses more than 4,000 miniature books in its collection, recently purchased a microscope for its conservation lab. That was certainly put to good use to inspect this book, so small that it cannot be read by the naked eye. After close examination, the book was found to have originally been part of a two-book set (partial Bibles, actually), marketed and sold at the World’s Fair in New York in 1965 by a Japanese publisher.

Photos by Colleen Theisen

Via theatlantic.com

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