Archives for posts with tag: miniature

It’s true that we’ve seen our fair share of movie posters through the years (here, here and here), but nothing quite like these. Manchester, UK-based designer/photographer/poster artist Jordan Bolton doesn’t rely on highly stylized shots from the film, or even the film’s actors. No effects-laden titles or much typography to speak of at all. Instead, for his Objects series, Bolton meticulously arranges prop elements from each film, paying careful attention to color palettes and composition to relay the film’s themes. For his Rooms series, Bolton applies that same attention to detail, focusing instead on recreating floor plans from keys scenes in the films. We cannot imagine how much close watching of these films Bolton does to be able to create these works. This is a true cinephile’s dream, and lucky for them Bolton sells prints here and here.

Via Tumblr and Facebook

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In much the same vein as the incredible work of Christopher Boffoli, Japanese artist/designer/art director, miniature photographer Tatsuya Tanaka’s playful take on macro photography is really memorable. Tanaka’s miniature dioramas, if you will, are almost like stepping into the mind of a young child, pushing his broccoli around the plate while his imagination runs wild. Tanaka says, “Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats. Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.” A key word here is everyday. Tanaka has actually committed himself to releasing one of these each day, a project aptly titled Miniature Calendar, and has been doing so since April 2011. Yes, everyday, folks. The body of work here is tremendous, and Tanaka’s perspective is fascinating. This is obviously just a very small sample of an incredible project that’s worth following. Just ask his impressive social media following: 35K on Facebook, 242K on Instagram, 88K on Twitter. Tanaka’s mission is simple: “It would be great if you could use it to add a little enjoyment to your everyday life.” We couldn’t agree more.

Via miniature-calendar.com

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Tilt–shift photography/videography is a technique often used to simulate a miniature scene. The selective focus style manipulates real-life scenes to look like small-scale models. Amsterdam-based photographer/designer/videographer Martijn Doolaard recently unveiled a mini-masterpiece utilizing this very technique. Entitled The Little Nordics, this short time-lapse video is a sort of love letter to the stunning landscapes of Norway and Iceland. In his own words, Doolaard gives a little back story: “Most parts are recorded in summer 2013. Prior to my trip to Norway I did not really have a plan for a movie. I visited Norway twice before and this time I wanted to go to some places I didn’t see before like Geiranger, Atlanterhavsveien and Trollstigen. Along the way I shot some timelapse videos of the fjords. Once I arrived in Geiranger I really enjoyed watching the hustle and bustle down the fjord. Ferries sailing back and forth through the fjords, kayak cruises arriving and departing and cars crawling up and down the steep roads. I liked the idea of portraying Norway as a cute little world while it’s known for it’s large scale nature and remote landscapes.” Doolaard is truly gifted, nailing every detail, from ambient sound effects, to the music and tempo. We could watch this over and over. Well done.

Via Vimeo and Facebook

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Cape Town artist, and self-described miniaturist, Lorraine Loots is big on talent. Back in January 2013 Loots began painting a miniature piece each day, aptly naming the project 365 Paintings for Ants. And when we say miniature, we mean minuscule… some are barely as large as one’s thumbnail. Her love for detail, however, is not at all diminutive and does not suffer in the least by the very small scale of her works. With little more than pencils, extremely fine paint brushes and a magnifying glass, Loots creates a unique work of art each day. For the first iteration of the project in 2013 her subjects were decidedly random. From something that pertained to her day, to a special event for a particular date, to even suggestions by others. Loots explains: “I see it as a kind of an interactive project. I’m definitely not the tortured artist sitting in a corner expressing my emotions. I’m influenced by everything around me.” For 2014, Loots decided to focus on Cape Town, in honor of its distinction of being named World Design Capital by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID) for its dedication to using design for social, cultural and economic development. Loots sells each original framed painting, as well as a very limited run of archival prints. Not only are her artistic skills prodigious, her entrepreneurial spirit is also impressive. Be sure to also check out the beautifully produced video below. We look forward to the project’s evolution for the coming year!

Via lorraineloots.com

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California-based artist Hoang Tran creates a really intriguing and intricate brand of art. Though he’s not the first to create art on this scale (here and here), or with crayons (here and here), Tran is certainly innovating. His painted details are really something. Not to mention his relevancy: Tran has carved characters from Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones and Adventure Time, among others. Some are even available for purchase.

Via Tumblr

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Word of this amazingly tiny tome broke this week, and we are fascinated. University of Iowa librarian Colleen Theisen recently stumbled upon the microscopic book, measuring just 0.138 inches square and 0.04 inches thick. Luckily the library, which houses more than 4,000 miniature books in its collection, recently purchased a microscope for its conservation lab. That was certainly put to good use to inspect this book, so small that it cannot be read by the naked eye. After close examination, the book was found to have originally been part of a two-book set (partial Bibles, actually), marketed and sold at the World’s Fair in New York in 1965 by a Japanese publisher.

Photos by Colleen Theisen

Via theatlantic.com

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