Archives for posts with tag: mortality

Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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