Archives for posts with tag: movement

We’ve seen a lot of intricate artwork fabricated from paper in new and interesting ways, but nothing quite like this. It’s the work of Cuban-born, North Carolina-based artist Felix Semper. While his sculptures resemble traditional stone busts, Semper injects a bit of a twist, literally, into these awesome creations. Rather than a hefty, solid material, Semper’s sculptures are crafted from hundreds of layers of glued paper to allow for surprising and awe-inspiring movement. With these stunning works, Sember flips the art of sculpture on its head… allowing a seemingly solid mass to twist and stretch. While we love all of his work, his most notable piece “Big Poppa” modeled after the late rap icon Notorious B.I.G. really strikes a chord. The juxtaposition of a contemporary figure in such a traditional art form is intriguing in and of itself, but the kinetic nature of Sember’s work makes it truly groundbreaking.

More paper artwork here and here and here.

Via felixsemper.com

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Chalking has been growing in popularity for years, in part due to the increased visibility of incredible artists like Dana Tanamachi (here) and others (here and here). There seems to be a mini movement in Japan right now involving blackboards and chalk (more here). As the saying goes, “everything old is new again”, blackboards, which are now being replaced with whiteboards, possess a sort of novelty these days. Hirotaka Hamasaki, aka Hamacream, is a Japanese art teacher with incredible skills and thousands of Instagram followers. His ability to recreate intricate familiar works of art (on a chalkboard, no less) is just stunning. Though the impermanence of this medium is a bit unnerving to us (we’d want to preserve these works for a long time), they are no less brilliantly executed for having been created with chalk. Truly inspiring.

Via Instagram and Twitter

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Creativity pulses through New Orleans artist Heather Hansen. And she, quite literally, puts her whole self into her work. A trained dancer with a love of fine arts, Hansen marries the two in beautiful and unexpected ways. With little more than charcoal in hand and fluid movements of her body on a giant canvas, Hansen produces stunning symmetrical kinetic works of art. Her thoughtfully choreographed movements are a sight to behold in and of themselves, but the patterns and lines that emerge in the process are the stars. This culmination of creativity is like nothing we’ve ever seen before. Absolutely beautiful.

Via heatherhansen.net

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We find the manipulation of wood just fascinating. In the right hands, the possibilities are endless. In its natural state as trees, wood can obviously be quite beautiful. But the notion that an artist can create objects that harken back to their natural state, even after having served a function, is really quite something. The extraordinary work of Paris-based French-Argentinean artist and designer Pablo Reinoso speaks to this very idea: “For the series entitled Spaghetti Bench, Pablo Reinoso used public benches, which are anonymously designed and travel across cultures with an out-of-time, old-fashioned quality, as a starting point for his reflections. Started in 2006, these new creations have multiplied and found homes in very diverse places. In line with his work on Thonet’s chairs, the artist explores once again the seat as object. Yet this time it is no longer the object but matter that frees itself from its function and pursues its fate of wood, tree, plant. Reinoso stages benches that, after having accomplished their task as furniture, revert into growing, climbing branches. This freedom is expressed in a movement that embraces architecture, wandering through places, exploring their nooks and crannies, and giving free rein to its whims.” The fluidity of his work, juxtaposed with the perceived functionality of the traditional park bench, makes for some thought-provoking art. Each seems to tell a story. We are particularly taken with the Romeo and Juliette bench that climbs a balcony overhead. Incredible.

Via pabloreinoso.com

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As technology advances, so too does our ability to track motion, as is exhibited by the iPhone, Fitbit, forthcoming Apple Watch, and others. But Canadian Stephen Orlando is more fixated with the beauty of motion, and innovative ways to capture it visually. Orlando, a mechanical engineer by trade, blurs the line between science and art in his stunning ongoing series Motion Exposure. By utilizing programmable LED lights and long exposure photography, Orlando is “able to tell the story of movement.” Though we’ve featured light painting before (here and here), Orlando’s work is a bit different. We love the spectrum of colors and intriguing patterns of motion he captures. In his own words, Orlando says “I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph…. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.” This growing series features motion captured by kayaking, canoeing, soccer, tennis, swimming and even waterfalls, and more. Absolutely beautiful.

Via motionexposure.com

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There are many little pleasures in life, and for us, two of those are sweets and typography (in no particular order). So when we stumbled upon this delicious work by Brazilian art director Ivan Loos, our day got a little brighter. Commissioned by Latin American commercial baking giant Bimbo for its Ana Maria brand, these custom typefaces were developed to appeal to a younger demographic by mimicking filling flavors (chocolate, vanilla and strawberry) for their cakes. Loos’s 3D work is flawless. We love that the characters are not perfect, but reflect the true mass and movement of these decadent delights. Clever name, too! Great work all around.

Via Behance

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We are the first to admit that snakes in the wild and snakes in a controlled setting like a zoo, or through the lens of a talented photographer are two entirely different experiences. We certainly don’t love snakes in the way some people have them as pets. But we do recognize their undeniable beauty and mystique, especially when Italian photographer Guido Mocafico is involved. For his book Serpens, published several years ago, Mocafico captured a variety of snakes, including vipers and cobras, in these stunning photos. We have always found the vivid colors, remarkable patterns and graceful movements of these creatures beautiful and creatively inspiring. Mocafico shares a similar sentiment: “I have always been terrified by these reptiles, but I also find them terribly fascinating. I felt a sort of repulsion-attraction for these living creatures…. If I had to define beauty, I’d say it has to contain an element of darkness or danger.”

Via guidomocafico.com and hamiltonsgallery.com

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There’s a lot of buzz surrounding the new Christopher Nolan science-fiction film Interstellar. Given the genre, and anticipation leading up to its release last week, it’s no surprise that a considerable amount of inspired art has surfaced online. Much of it is fan art, but these poster comps by Los Angeles-based designer/art director James Fletcher are more than that. Certainly a fan, but also an entertainment industry insider, Fletcher has loads of experience working in the field. And it shows. We love the variety of his layouts, and the level of detail he brings to the table. There’s nothing static about them… they could be part of the movie itself. These posters are impactful, engaging, and just darn good. Well done. Be sure to check out more of Fletcher’s stellar work.

Via dreamstateconcepts.com and Behance

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Relying on forms of matter (say liquids and fine solids like powder) in photography can be a very tricky proposition. So much could go wrong. But for London-based photographer Iain Crawford such carefully planned orchestrations result in some incredible photography. Crawford has a very adventurous spirit when it comes to his photography work. He is always looking to push boundaries by finding new ways of doing things. His images embody a beautiful (and unpredictable) kinetic energy that seems almost impossible to capture without digital facilitation of Photoshop. Crawford on his work with paint, in his own words: “I love the fusion between paint and model. The resulting shapes are as opulent as any piece of bespoke couture. The excitement and anticipation as we waited to see the next piece of unpredictable chaos was electric. There was something magical about how random chance materialized into beautiful images in front of our eyes.”

Via iaincrawford.com

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The work of French sculptor Bruno Catalano is almost like an optical illusion. This series of arresting bronze sculptures depicts travelers, as exhibited by the luggage they are holding, and look of purpose, heading toward some unknown destination. But what is really remarkable about these pieces is what you can not see… the missing parts. Catalano creates these large figures with large (vital) chunks missing, which makes for truly intriguing work. In his own words (in loose translation): “It is no longer a man’s world, but the man in the world, yet full of culture but became brittle at the immensity. His quest will not be without damage. Man defragmented destabilized, stripped of his marks, he walks to his salvation as well as to saperte. Everything will now have reinvented. This traveler escapes from himself, to meet his unknown land.” Incredible, thought-provoking work.

Via brunocatalano.com and Facebook

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