Archives for posts with tag: movement

With school back in session, it seemed appropriate to feature some brilliant design work that’s education related. Turkish designer Efil Türk had the tall order of illustrating ten principles of design for her thesis project at Dokuz Eylul University of Fine Arts in İzmir, Turkey. These visual fundamentals — balance, hierarchy, pattern, rhythm, space, proportion, emphasis, movement, contrast, and unity — are truly universal. And Türk handles them in a really beautiful and effective way… with hand-cut paper, no less. We love Türk’s choice of colors and shapes, and her typography skills are not too shabby either. Türk is clearly very talented, we look forward to checking out her growing portfolio in the near future. More paper art posts here and here and here.

Via Tumblr and Instagram

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Paris-based, Israeli-born image-maker/photographer Ben Sandler creates more than just pretty pictures. Sandler’s work is conceptually driven, challenging the viewer with thoughtfully crafted visuals. We are really taken with the theme of dissection, which we’ve seen in some of his work. In “No Limit” Sandler was faced with the task by Amusement Magazine to envision what the future will be like with the rise of on-demand production by 3D printers. What could have been an overly futuristic Photoshop extravaganza is an impeccable exploded view of the anatomy of a wristwatch. And for an editorial story on the subject of human movement for the French publication, Blast Magazine, Sandler utilizes long exposure in some really compelling ways. More on the subject of disassembly here.

Via bensandler.com and Behance

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Japanese sculptor Tomohiro Inaba’s unique approach is striking. Some of his work, consisting of steel wires of varying densities, almost looks like it’s moving. The subject matter of many of these pieces is animals… they start off in full form then dissolve into a tangled web of wire. Inaba achieves an awesome impression of movement, like an organic form transforming into a digitally knotted mass.

Via tomohiro-inaba.com

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Though we’ve seen his work before, it was only recently what we really took notice of Simon Birch’s stellar paintings. These large scale works by Birch, a U.K.-born artist, of Armenian descent, who is a permanent resident of Hong Kong, have an almost geometric quality to them. And from a distance, have a slight resemblance to manipulated photographs. There’s also something to be said for Birch’s sense of color, which is really remarkable. Any way you look at it, Birch’s talent is quite considerable. We’d love to see his work in person. Be sure to check out the video for a behind-the-scenes look at Birch in action.

Via simon-birch.com and Behance

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