Archives for posts with tag: mystery

Disney characters are so ubiquitous in today’s popular culture that they are sometimes the subject of a less wholesome narrative (as seen here and here). In his series Noir Princesses, San Diego-based illustrator/artist Astor Alexander explores Disney princesses in a darker light. These highly stylized portraits harken back to mystery novels and films of the 1940s and 50s and tell stories centered around said princesses as noir fiction protagonists. Alexander’s talent is undeniable, and his aesthetic is right on the money. He captures the individual personality of each recognizable princess character while transporting them all to a less familiar setting with a foreboding cinematic quality.

Prints available here.

Via Behance and Instagram

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In honor of National Coffee Day, we thought it fitting to showcase an artist who (subtly) uses the magical brown elixir to make art. Maui-based mixed-media artist Alessandra Maria creates beautifully detailed, dark and delicate portraits using little more than a pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee-stained paper. Inspired by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, Maria’s haunting life-like portraits evoke fantasy and mystery with intricate details set on an eerily enigmatic surface achieved through the coffee’s dark brown grounds. There are even religious overtones in these thought-provoking masterpieces. Maria’s work is simply beautiful and poignant.

Via alessandramaria.com

Israeli photographer Rubi Lebovitch has a sort of subversive sense of humor, and for the record, we love it. Though his photographs themselves are pretty straightforward, Lebovitch has the uncanny ability to find the absurd in the ordinary. There’s a great cerebral quality to his work, in which the viewer is not guided by a predetermined story arc, but instead can deduce any number of things from his unexpected and beautifully absurd work. For his series Home Sweet Home, Lebovitch utilizes an intimate domestic setting for a veritable fun house. There is a certain charm in Lebovitch’s hyperbole, and ironically enough, you too can display it in your own home in a tidy coffee table book (available here). In his own words, Lebovitch discusses his book: “My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images…characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meanings. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. My images do not contain a clear-cut story or plot. The characters are inscrutable to the viewers and difficult to identify; their relationship with the world around them is senseless and they fail to communicate. Rationality is substituted by a twisted and exaggerated worldview. I employ a multiplicity of objects, allowing the objects to grow stronger and take over reality; they occupy and control the space. The scenes depicted in the photographs emphasize what usually remains hidden: the repressed, which cannot be described. The anxiety these scenes arouse undermines the peacefulness and security usually associated with home.”

Via rubilebovitch.com and loeildelaphotographie.com

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Graffiti by its very nature changes the appearance of the surface on which it is displayed. But what happens when the “graffiti” itself continually changes as well? Delhi, India-based graffiti artist Daku (which literally means “bandit” or “dacoit” in Hindi… clearly a reference to the outlaw nature of graffiti art itself) explores this concept with his absolutely brilliant piece Time Changes Everything. Technically more public art than graffiti, Daku worked with St+art India Foundation, a non-profit organization that works on art projects in public spaces with accessibility of art as the main goal. Daku’s innovative work is basically a typographic sundial, where thoughtfully chosen words associated with change over the passage of time cast a shadow on a building’s facade by way of sunlight. From conception to execution, we are absolutely taken with this project. Mystery surrounding Daku’s actual identity may be part of his allure, but his overwhelming talent is crystal clear.

Via st-artindia.org and Instagram (daku156 and startindia)

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