Archives for posts with tag: neon

We can all agree that the 1980s had a very specific aesthetic that proliferated into all areas of our culture, from fashion to music to graphic design and everything in between. So when digital artist/musician/internet persona Future Punk recently took some, ahem, very recognizable brands and gave them an 80s-styled retro makeover, we swooned. Future Punk (we’ve unsuccessfully scoured the internet for any clues as to his/her true identity) employs an arsenal of 1980s mainstays, including neon, chrome and Memphis-style elements to take current brand logos back to the future. Future Punk could honestly continue this great series for quite sometime… here’s to hoping!

Via future-punk.com

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What the…!? The unbelievable work of UK designer/illustrator Chris LaBrooy (previously featured here) elicits confusion, amazement and delight all at the same time. LaBrooy’s tremendously realistic (yet highly unlikely) 3D creations are nothing short of spectacular. We are particularly taken with his automobile works, which appropriately feature the words “aerobics” and “elasticity” in their titles… words obviously not associated with rigid metal motor vehicles, but perfectly normal in this twisted alter universe. LaBrooy takes digital manipulation to a whole other level, bending and stretching familiar objects with such precision. We absolutely love what LaBrooy is doing, and look forward to his future work.

Via chrislabrooy.com

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It’s no secret that we are totally taken with graphical interpretations of the alphabet, conceptual typography, and works that are done as a series. This gem of a project, by Paris-based designer Alexis Persani, gets high marks all around. Persani’s 3D illustration work is stellar. It doesn’t feel like the 3D is a gratuitous effect, but rather advances the concept of the figures. He is thoughtful in his choices, and presents each character as a sculpture that could stand on its own, paying particular attention to texture, lighting and color. Fantastic series that can be enjoyed by type geeks like us, or just about anyone else. Well done.

More experimental typography posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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