Archives for posts with tag: New York

Time-based photography can be powerful and very telling. And few know this better than Danish photographer Peter Funch. For nearly a decade, Funch photographed the ritualistic exodus from (presumably) home to work. Funch took up a post just outside of Grand Central Station in New York City, as morning commuters scurried the streets of Manhattan in the morning hour between 8:30 and 9:30 AM. Just as his new book’s title states, Funch’s fastidious documentation took place at the corner of 42nd and Vanderbilt. During the editing process, Funch began to notice patterns… the same folks were being captured days, weeks and even years apart (and often wearing the same outfits). And, often, these familiar strangers were traveling in packs next to or near each other daily, paying little attention to one another, day after day, week after week. Funch’s work captures these fascinating patterns and really speaks to cliches about the daily grind, monotonous routines of daily life… about the proverbial rat race.

Via peterfunch.com and Instagram

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Posters are some of our favorite, yet challenging, projects. Poster design is a marriage between visual aesthetic and the delivery of information, between textual and graphical elements… the very fundamentals of graphic design. It should come as no surprise, then, that an institution as important and influential as the New York Film Festival places great emphasis on this visual embodiment of its annual event. Festival organizers manage to recruit some truly respected artists and photographers year after year for its remarkable posters. Below is just a sampling, starting with this year’s by renowned sculptor Richard Serra.

Via nytimes.com

In recent years, much has been made about America’s addiction to sugar (eye-opening 60 Minutes piece of journalism, here). It really is an epidemic whose impact has yet to be truly realized. But we are slowly waking up to the fact that our sugar-loaded diet is not only making us fat, but it’s also killing us with covert toxicity. New York-based production company Dress Code recently tackled the subject through a thoughtful animated short, aptly titled Coke Habit. Though Dress Code’s usual workload is of the commercial variety, original content plays an important role in any creative enterprise. This superbly crafted surrealist mini masterpiece, featuring arguably the most iconic brand on the planet, tells a true childhood story of staffer “Mike” and his Coke addiction… as in seemingly benign Coca-Cola. From their adept use of color to their masterful storytelling, Dress Code hits all the marks with this brilliant little film.

Via Vimeo and dresscodeny.com

We are compelled to check in on the work of renowned Russian illustrator/graphic designer Eiko Ojala every so often (here and here) because he’s just so good. Ojala’s style is distinct… we now recognize it from a mile away. These are truly mixed media endeavors, mixing digital illustration, paper textures, and both real and artificial shadows. His adept sense of color, composition and depth are hallmarks of his incredible body of work, which includes illustrations for a variety of impressive clients including The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler Magazine, Herman Miller, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American Mind, Ebony Magazine and The New Yorker. Here’s a sampling of some of his more recent work, including a children’s book he recently illustrated (available for purchase here). Enjoy.

Via ploom.tv

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

A post shared by Sam Kaplan (@samkaplanphoto) on

Philippine-born, Florida-based photographer Dennis Ramos has a penchant for atmospheric black and white photography. We are particularly fond of his architectural work, which casts a haunting glow over his subjects. Seen through Ramos’s lens, the world seems to stand still, and his skilled eye has a way of really accentuating the beauty of architectural lines by way of light, shadow and reflection. Really beautiful work.

Via dennis-ramos.com and Behance

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In an effort to come full circle in recognizing the very polarizing Common Core testing in New York over the past two weeks, we bring you another “math meets art” post. This time it’s the work of Venezuelan architect and illustrator Rafael Araujo, and his very technical approach to capturing the mathematical brilliance of nature. With simple drafting tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor), Araujo takes much pleasure and pride being unplugged from technology while exploring three dimensionality (yes, without the aid of a computer), which can take up to 100 hours to create a single complex composition. We cannot wrap our brains around how one would even begin to approach this, so needless to say, we are in complete awe of Araujo. As are the thousands of backers who contributed to his Kickstarter campaign to publish a book of his work, which began several months ago with a goal just over $20,000. Araujo has since raised over a quarter of a million dollars to date, with the help of Sydney, Australia-based husband and wife team Melinda and Andres Restrepo. The Restrepos were so taken with Araujo’s work online, they approached him about creating a book. Capitalizing on the growing popularity of “adult coloring books” (c’mon, not X-rated, but those touting supposed “stress relieving” patterns), the project to publish the Golden Ratio Coloring Book is forging ahead. When you look at the sampling of Araujo’s work below, just keep in mind that they are all done by hand. Simply breathtaking.

Via rafael-araujo.com

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Given all the snow in the news lately, we thought it fitting to peek at the work of street artist simply known as Faust. Paying homage to a favorite pastime for most who have grown up with even semi-snowy winters, he brings his impeccable calligraphy skills to snow-covered surfaces in a series he calls Snow Script. Faust fuels that childlike urge to run his fingers through the snow by stealthily adorning surfaces after a fresh snowfall with his stellar typography, then documenting it. Be sure to check out the rest of his killer work for an impressive roster of clients, including a mural just a stone’s throw away from our Rochester studio (photos below).

Not exactly the same, but vaguely reminiscent post here

Via Behance

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Full disclosure: we’re having a moment of design envy. And for several reasons. The subject of our aspirational glares is Big Apple-based designer/illustrator José Guizar’s self-initiated, ongoing weekly project Windows of New York. First, we are truly inspired by “daily” projects. We admire the commitment of artists who hone their craft through some sort of consistent work, whether it be daily, weekly, monthly (for example, here and here and here). It truly is a creative exercise, to motivate one’s self to conjure creativity for the sake of it, and at regular intervals, no less. Second, with distractions aplenty, from our Apple i-devices, to social media, to everyday hustle and bustle, being mindful enough to stop and appreciate architectural details around us is easier said than done. Such inquisitiveness and passion are what drives Guizar. Finally, his incredible illustration skills really make this project what it is. In the hands of a less-skilled artist, this undertaking wouldn’t be quite so notable. But Guizar’s spare, yet detailed design approach is perfectly engaging. From his flat style, to his terrific sense of color and composition, to his attention to typography, Guizar’s growing collection of diverse architectural specimens reflects his personal spirit of curiosity and exploration, and should be cherished and admired by designers for quite sometime. Hats off to Guizar for a well-conceived and expertly executed personal project.

Via windowsofnewyork.com

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We’ve all been there before… a dreaded lecture, and one’s mind starts to wander as pencil meets paper to create some nonsensical drawing. Doodling is a favorite pastime of bored students the world over. But when elevated to this level of artistry, we sit up and take notice. Japanese artist Keita Sagaki’s prolific body of (rather time consuming) work is really impressive. Sagaki juxtaposes recreations of well-known fine art pieces with what would otherwise be considered notebook doodles. From a distance these large-scale works (often several feet in length) bear a striking resemblance to such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, and The Last Supper. But upon closer examination, they are actually densely hand-drawn improvised doodles. Sagaki has even been commissioned to apply his unique method of art making to create famous landmarks from around the world. Just amazing.

Via sagakikeita.com

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