Archives for posts with tag: Nike

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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What do you get when you unite a talented, young, rebellious artist with discarded artwork? Renaissance paintings that demand a double-take, for one. French artist Blase, aka Blasepheme, has artistic skills rooted in time-honored techniques. But his subversive sense of humor will not allow him to simply restore flea market finds. Blase does much more than that… he scours sales and brings old paintings back to life with fresh concepts and often satirical touches. Some may question a lack of respect for artists who came before him, but Blase can rest easy knowing that he is in the business of resurrecting these otherwise unwanted works, and giving them relevance. Proved by this very post… we’re talking about said paintings from some 3,600 miles away over the internet in 2017! Blase’s work is nothing short of badass, and we applaud not only his artistic prowess but also his defiant spirit.

More artistic renegades here and here and here.

Via blasepheme.com

Some of the best, most thought-provoking art and design is best viewed from a variety of angles. In fact, the work of Brooklyn-based artist Michael Murphy relies on varying vantage points. Murphy’s large-scale, complex structures are profoundly awe-inspiring (these photos surely don’t do them justice, they are best viewed in person). His multi-layered, multi-dimensional sculptures consist of suspended objects that, when viewed from different perspectives, reveal something more. Murphy explains, “[my] large-scale works seek to dominate the viewer’s physical and mental space, captivating the critical thought process as one circles around the various entities that form a cohesive whole. Pieces initially experienced on a visually flat plane resonate with meaning upon closer inspection, opening up cerebral capacities to perpetual reconsideration. The mesmerizing effect of the varied angles and ingredients of [my] sculptures provoke thought, using aesthetic titillation as their gateway.” Murphy’s conceptual approach, paired with his calculated orchestration of these phenomenal installations, is a true marvel on a many levels. Wow.

Via mmike.com

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A couple members of the Barbour team had the honor of witnessing a speaking engagement by the incomparable Dana Tanamachi at Create Upstate in Syracuse last week. The event itself was terrific, from the impressive venue (great food, btw), awesome vendors, and stellar lineup of speakers. One highlight was undoubtedly the inspirational work and philosophy of Tanamachi. Honestly, we’re not saying anything new here, just bowing down, as most who are exposed to her transcendent work tend to do. Texas-bred, Brooklyn-based Tanamachi, whose lettering work is quite ubiquitous (you’ve probably seen it, or a rip-off of it, and may not have realized it was hers), seems quite gracious, humble, passionate and sincere when discussing her craft. She’s not some Brooklyn hipster who is too cool for school. Her tremendous talents seemed to have emerged over time, and her rise in the design world happened organically, which we truly admire. Tanamachi is a rock star among our peers, and we are just happy to have spent an engaging hour in her presence. Here’s a small sampling of her formidable body of work… prepare to drool.

Via tanamachistudio.com

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Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

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There’s no doubt that in our image-obsessed culture particular iconic brands still have a certain cachet to inspire art. And that is, at least in part, a good indicator that they are iconic. These portraits by German-based illustrator/Designer Andy Gellenberg are a perfect example. Gellenberg painstakingly created these portraits in the likeness of a few sports icons, LeBron, Tiger and P-Rod, entirely out of the ubiquitous Nike swoosh. His sense of color and tone really shines here, using such a specific form to create a larger, very recognizable image. Pretty amazing.

Via Behance

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French illustrator/designer Florian Nicolle employs mixed media to create wonderfully complex portraits that are so bold, yet nuanced, that they almost seem to move. With newsprint, watercolor, pencil, ink and Photoshop in his arsenal, Nicolle’s meticulously crafted chaos has been sought after by some pretty high profile clients, including Nike, Puma, Los Angeles Times and ESPN, among others. We love his style, and look forward to keeping an eye on his growing portfolio.

Via Behance

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As designers, we notice all things design. And it’s everywhere. Literally. London-based illustrator/designer/artist (and sneakerhead) Stephen Cheetham has a keen eye for sneaker boxes. This series of prints (for sale here) explores the evolution of packaging for several revered sneaker brands. Would love to see Cheetham’s take on Puma!

Via stephencheetham.com

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As designers, we have to retouch photos at least occasionally. But this retouching, by Portland, OR-based designer/photographer/Photoshop expert Daniel Kopton (AKA DanKlife), is truly awe-inspiring. Like a masterclass in photo retouching, this before-and-after look at Kopton’s work for Nike USA Basketball campaign is really enlightening… not only for the robust capabilities of modern computer software, but also the sheer talent of Kopton. Will definitely be looking at these every so often for a dose of inspiration.

Via Behance

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We’ve seen the terrific typographic work of Bilbao, Spain-based designer Txaber before (here). His latest work, a custom typeface for Nike is a great addition to his body of work. It’s composed of wooden slats, but for some added texture and dimension, Txaber curls the top layers. And the result is quite beautiful.

Via txaber.net

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