Archives for posts with tag: nuance

We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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We’ve all enjoyed colored pencils at one time or another, but few pull off the depth and richness when utilizing these basic tools as Ontario-based illustrator/tattoo artist Andrew Wilson. Wilson’s creations are not simply sketches, but carefully crafted works of art that would make a digital illustrator envious. We love that Wilson creates these pieces by hand, and is able to achieve such contrast and nuance, especially in the shadows and highlights. And we’re not alone in our admiration of Wilson’s tremendous skills. His social media stats speak for themselves… 94,000 likes on his Facebook page, and 53,000 followers on Instagram. We will definitely be checking back on Wilson’s growing body of work, just awesome.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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London-based mixed media artist Nick Gentry, like many other creative individuals, creates artwork partly as a means to disseminate some sort of commentary. Gentry’s work is not only visually stunning, but also touches on the evolution of “consumerism, technology, identity and cyberculture in society, with a distinctive focus on obsolete media.” Gentry recycles such outdated media, like floppy disks and film negatives, and transforms them into arresting mosaics with layers of detail and nuance. And the details are not only aesthetic, but also in the media themselves, which once seemingly held a level of importance to their owners…  Gentry’s work could be seen as a mode of preservation, if you will. And he even engages viewers in his innovative “social” art by soliciting donations of otherwise discarded media. Brilliant.

Books available here.

Via nickgentry.com

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French painter Françoise Nielly employs a really bold and vivid style that we are really drawn to. Not only does she have an excellent sense of color, but the composition of her work is also notable. The nuance and detail she achieves with her knife is almost like sculpture.

Via francoise-nielly.com

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Russian illustrator/designer/art director Eiko Ojala creates beautiful work with paper. The layering technique Ojala employes in his collages feels really fresh and unique. The nuance he achieves in small details, particularly in his portrait work, is really something. His keen sense of color rounds out this excellent body of work.

Via ploom.tv

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Texas-based artist Matthew Cusick creates these incredible collages using cutout maps. The level of nuance in these intricate designs is really something to behold… they almost look like paintings or drawings from afar. Cusick explains what drew him to maps as a medium: “Maps have all the properties of a brushstroke: nuance, density, line, movement, and color…. [And] since each map fragment is an index of a specific place and time, I could combine fragments from different maps and construct geographical timelines within my paintings.”

Via mattcusick.com

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