Archives for posts with tag: nuances

Let’s face it, emojis have infiltrated the general consciousness. When your mom is using them, you know they’ve hit the mainstream. These small digital images used to express an idea, emotion, etc., in electronic communication are now becoming the subject of art itself, which is another touchstone of cultural proliferation. Wildly talented Toronto-based letterer/designer/artist Christopher Rouleau has created a typographic set of letterforms using these tiny icons in fantastic ways. They are not simply cobbled together haphazardly, but thoughtfully constructed to reveal a variety of nuances in unexpected ways. For one, the emojis used start with the letter they are creating. We love Rouleau’s out-of-the-box thinking. He rolled out the set, one-by-one via his Instagram recently. Rouleau is no one hit wonder… be sure to check out his body of terrific work here.

Via Instagram

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A favorite pastime of many, during the holiday season and throughout the year, is assembling jigsaw puzzles. Children around the world usually start with an elementary 24-piece puzzle, and graduate to more advanced puzzles containing many more pieces. Australian artist/illustrator/designer Clemens Habicht has created perhaps one of the most difficult (and beautiful) puzzles we’ve ever seen. Even we as designers, who have a bit of an edge given our intimate knowledge in the nuances of color, see this is quite daunting. Rather than recreating an image, this puzzle requires you to assemble the pieces based on a CMYK color gamut. That’s right, a 1,000-piece puzzle made up of simple 1,000 different colored pieces. In his own words, Habicht discusses: “The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of color, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details. What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.” Sweet satisfaction, indeed. If/when we tackle this, we will be sure to post the result!

Via Tumblr and lamingtondrive.com

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People show appreciation for their friends in many different ways. Milan-based illustrator/artist Thomas Cian reserves pages of a Moleskine journal for emotive pencil drawings of those closest to him. And given his supreme illustration skills, we’d say each mini-masterpiece is quite a tribute. His sense of composition and use of the spreads is terrific. The details and nuances of shading he achieves with a simple piece of graphite is really impressive. Cian is a very gifted artist, and we should consider ourselves lucky to be exposed to such raw and personal work.

Via Behance

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