Archives for posts with tag: object

The artist who brought us the Political Lamp (here) has another intriguing and unsettling creation: the Earthquake Lamp. Much like his work on the Political Lamp, French artist known only as ParseError explores art, design, technology, and science through this fascinating object. Linked to data from IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), the Earthquake Lamp responds in real time to earthquakes from around the world with pulsing lights and an unsettling sort of rumble. As an object, it’s really quite beautiful. But the meaningful, connected aspect elevates it well beyond just a decorative piece. The technology is so nuanced, its light and sound output changes according to the location and magnitude of the earthquake, varying the color and duration of the pulsations, and the power of the sound. Ironically, (what appears to be) its glass tube design looks quite fragile, so in the event of a local earthquake, one may be left with a pile of glass. Either way, ParseError has done it again… walking that line between anxiety and fascination. And evoking emotion is what art is all about.

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

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We find the manipulation of wood just fascinating. In the right hands, the possibilities are endless. In its natural state as trees, wood can obviously be quite beautiful. But the notion that an artist can create objects that harken back to their natural state, even after having served a function, is really quite something. The extraordinary work of Paris-based French-Argentinean artist and designer Pablo Reinoso speaks to this very idea: “For the series entitled Spaghetti Bench, Pablo Reinoso used public benches, which are anonymously designed and travel across cultures with an out-of-time, old-fashioned quality, as a starting point for his reflections. Started in 2006, these new creations have multiplied and found homes in very diverse places. In line with his work on Thonet’s chairs, the artist explores once again the seat as object. Yet this time it is no longer the object but matter that frees itself from its function and pursues its fate of wood, tree, plant. Reinoso stages benches that, after having accomplished their task as furniture, revert into growing, climbing branches. This freedom is expressed in a movement that embraces architecture, wandering through places, exploring their nooks and crannies, and giving free rein to its whims.” The fluidity of his work, juxtaposed with the perceived functionality of the traditional park bench, makes for some thought-provoking art. Each seems to tell a story. We are particularly taken with the Romeo and Juliette bench that climbs a balcony overhead. Incredible.

Via pabloreinoso.com

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