Archives for posts with tag: orange

We are thrilled to announce that the Barbour collection of awards has seen significant growth with the addition of several prestigious recognitions.

See live announcement with links here

160114_barbouraward_email

Advertisements

On this Election Day, we bring you some of our favorite works inspired by this historic election season. In order: Boston-based artist and collage master Molly Scannell; Brooklyn-based artist and educator David Hollier; Nashville-based artist and sculptor Herb Williams (previous posts here and here); Brazilian artist Butcher Billy (previous post here); Nashville-based (Rochester-born) painter Kristin Llamas. Politics as the subject of art has never been more prevalent. Whether it be the polarizing nature of this particular presidential election, or the reach of social media (probably both, actually), talented artists from all over the country and world have been churning our artwork inspired by this moment in history. Let’s just hope everyone is as energized to vote. Go vote!

Via Instagram, Instagram, Flickr, Behance and kllamas.com

election-01 election-02 election-03 election-04 election-05 election-06 election-07 election-08 election-09

Painting rocks is a favorite pastime of many, but Michigan artist/illustrator/designer/author/educator Aaron Zenz has taken it to a whole other level. In preparation for what is now known as the “most-attended public art event on the planet”, ArtPrize in Grand Rapids, Michigan (happening right now), Zenz and his six children collected and painted over 1,000 rocks over the course of a year. Zenz describes the project in his own words: “I painted them 7 solid base colors, representing myself and my six children. I invited these family members to fill the rocks with any kind of faces they wanted. All the rocks were painted in matching pairs. I took half of the rocks, 500, and arranged them outside the Children’s Museum in a sprawling display, creating a kaleidoscope of colors, shapes, and patterns. I took the other matching 500 rocks and hid them all over Grand Rapids in random locations. As your family enjoys the day at ArtPrize, keep your eyes open! You will notice details of GR streets like never before. How many of the 500 hidden rocks can you spot? Who in your party has the quickest eyes? When you spot one, leave it where it is and snap a photo. View and share photo discoveries on social media with the hashtag #RockAroundGR to get the complete community building experience.” What a fantastic undertaking on so many levels. With all the often somber headlines lately, this home-grown, positive interactive art experience is certainly a welcome highlight. We only wish it was closer! Think of it as a Stone Age Pokémon GO.

Via artprize.org

zenz-01 zenz-02 zenz-03 zenz-04 zenz-05 zenz-06 zenz-07 zenz-08 zenz-09 zenz-10 zenz-11 zenz-12 zenz-13 zenz-14 zenz-15 zenz-16

Fresh on the minds of Americans in this spirited election season, and following last night’s first presidential debate, Donald Trump has firmly cemented his Q Rating (whether favorable or not) into the public consciousness. It should come as no surprise, then, when artwork reflects current affairs (related posts here and here). We’ve discussed the awesome and thought-provoking work of Brazilian artist Butcher Billy not long ago (here), and thought it fitting to share his recent series featuring Trump. Butcher Billy’s skill is clear, and this homage to Belgian surrealist René Magritte, aptly titled Trump X Magritte: The Surrealist Series, draws on his keen sense of color and composition. As Butcher Billy says himself, “Because nothing is more surreal than The Donald.”

Via Behance

butcherbilly-01 butcherbilly-02 butcherbilly-03 butcherbilly-04 butcherbilly-05 butcherbilly-06 butcherbilly-07 butcherbilly-08 butcherbilly-09 butcherbilly-10 butcherbilly-11 butcherbilly-12

Japanese artist and student Hikaru Cho seems to employ her stellar artistic skills with a single purpose: illusion. Whether it be illustration, body painting, or sculpture, Cho aims to woo viewers with deception… in a (usually) playful, lighthearted manner, of course. Her work can be a bit unnerving at times… adding extra eyes, misplacing ears, etc. On the other hand, she also likes to play with food, disguising one food as another, for example. No matter that subject matter, Cho’s work certainly intrigues. Her personality shines through, which is impressive considering her tremendous skill set. It’s hard to believe she’s still a student! Cho certainly has a bright future ahead… we’re going to keep an eye on her.

Via hikarucho.com

Cho-01 Cho-02 Cho-03 Cho-04 Cho-05 Cho-06 Cho-07 Cho-08 Cho-09 Cho-10 Cho-11 Cho-12 Cho-13 Cho-14 Cho-15 Cho-16 Cho-17 Cho-18 Cho-19 Cho-20 Cho-21 Cho-22 Cho-23 Cho-24 Cho-25 Cho-26 Cho-27 Cho-28 Cho-29 Cho-30 Cho-31 Cho-32

Conceptual food photography has got to be one of our favorite niche disciplines lately, only confirmed by this excellent collaboration between Sydney-based creatives Enrico Becker and Matt Harris. Created as visuals to accompany editorial on genetically modified foods, these photos could easily stand on their own. We love the choice of colors and thoughtful compositions. The pastel tones of the produce, along with the bar codes of course, push the work into surreal territory. And quite effectively, we might add. In his own words, Becker explains, “As shooting style, we were going for a more pastel monochromatic still-life style approach. The end result of the shoot was combined in an awesome two-spread magazine layout with a well written article about genetically modified food by Matt Harris. The idea was to create a combination between the photography and the written text.” Oh, and did we mention these guys are also students? Nice work, by any measure.

Via enricobecker.com

Becker-01 Becker-02 Becker-03 Becker-04 Becker-05 Becker-06 Becker-07

In addition to being aesthetically innovative, Torino, Italy-based photographer Giorgio Cravero’s series, entitled simply Colors, is also fueled by a belief that we humans are slowly killing nature’s bounty. Cravero shot the fruits and vegetables, then masterfully retouched them to look like the life (color) is dripping away. “Men are poison for the earth. Behind this work there’s the story of what we are and of our arrogance when we think that we really count…. Here, in that cabbage which was sadly left to its fate, lies all the tragic meaning of our smallness and of our short memory, because we should have stayed there, close and loyal to the Earth, we should have stayed humble.” Though we may not totally agree with Cravero’s sullen position, we understand the sentiment. And there’s certainly no denying his immense talent and superb execution of these photographs.

Via Behance

Cravero-1 Cravero-2 Cravero-3 Cravero-4 Cravero-5 Cravero-6

One sign of a gifted photographer is finding beauty in mundane, everyday subjects. Take popular aquarium “betta” fish (otherwise known as Siamese fighting fish), for example. Sure, they’re lovely domestic pets, but Thai photographer Visarute Angkatavanich captures them in all their beauty and elegance like we’ve never seen before, despite their rather aggressive nature (hence their name). Through Angkatavanich’s lens, they look exotic and mysterious. A commercial photographer by trade, Angkatavanich decided to experiment with shooting these colorful cold-blooded vertebrates a few years ago on a whim. And the results are truly stunning. We love how they appear to be suspended in air, the water they are submerged in not even apparent. It’s like they’re wearing luxurious, flowing gowns.

More fish posts here and here. And creative animal photography here and here

Via 500px.com

Angkatavanich-1 Angkatavanich-2 Angkatavanich-3 Angkatavanich-4 Angkatavanich-5 Angkatavanich-6 Angkatavanich-7 Angkatavanich-8

The talent coming out of Savannah College of Art and Design is quite remarkable. And the work of SCAD senior Weston Doty, currently studying Graphic Design and Photography, is particularly notable. We’re especially taken with Doty’s project titled Split, which he describes as “observation & experimentation of form + color”. We admit that we have an affinity for food-related design (as evidenced here and here and here), but Doty’s keen sense of color and composition are what really draw us to this series. Doty exhibits an air of design maturity in his work, and we imagine he will be making his mark in the design community for years to come (his terrific name can’t hurt either).

Via Behance

Doty-1 Doty-2 Doty-3 Doty-4 Doty-5 Doty-6

%d bloggers like this: