Archives for posts with tag: orderly

In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

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Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

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New York City-based photographer Barry Rosenthal has a thing for sorting. In his series “Found In Nature,” Rosenthal builds fascinating compositions from discarded items found along the beaches of New York Harbor. Rosenthal’s orderly masterpieces, comprised basically of abandoned junk, are sorted by type, color and/or theme, and each piece tells a unique story. In his own words, Rosenthal talks about his piece titled “Plastic Puzzle”: White plastic objects. The ‘beaches’ I walk are not the places that families go for sun and surf. They are overlooked wetlands. This composition came about from my experiments with perspective. My theme is simple; make a puzzle from the objects. This my first collection of objects post Hurricane Sandy. My usual hunting ground was not accessable. It had become a FEMA staging area for the Rockaways. I was forced to find new, fertile tidal areas to clean or glean a theme.

We are really fond of Rosenthal’s thoughtful and compelling compositions. And we, too, have a thing for organization and order; see previous posts on the subject here and here and here.

Via barryrosenthal.com

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At one point or another we’ve probably all disassembled something out of sheer curiosity about what it’s really made of. Toronto-based artist/photographer Todd McLellan takes such inquisitiveness to a whole new level, literally making art of it. In his book, Things Come Apart, McLellan disassembles a variety of objects, from clocks to chainsaws to computers, and meticulously organizes them. The end result is a series of beautiful photos that exemplify OCD organization (for sale here). And we love organization (here and here and here).

Via toddmclellan.com

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Whether you have a sweet tooth or not, you’ll surely appreciate this monochromatic Sugar Series by Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe. We love orderly groupings (here and here), and food, of course (here and here and here). And this is the best of both worlds. Great series.

Via thesewoods.com

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