Archives for posts with tag: organic

A couple members of the Barbour team had the honor of witnessing a speaking engagement by the incomparable Dana Tanamachi at Create Upstate in Syracuse last week. The event itself was terrific, from the impressive venue (great food, btw), awesome vendors, and stellar lineup of speakers. One highlight was undoubtedly the inspirational work and philosophy of Tanamachi. Honestly, we’re not saying anything new here, just bowing down, as most who are exposed to her transcendent work tend to do. Texas-bred, Brooklyn-based Tanamachi, whose lettering work is quite ubiquitous (you’ve probably seen it, or a rip-off of it, and may not have realized it was hers), seems quite gracious, humble, passionate and sincere when discussing her craft. She’s not some Brooklyn hipster who is too cool for school. Her tremendous talents seemed to have emerged over time, and her rise in the design world happened organically, which we truly admire. Tanamachi is a rock star among our peers, and we are just happy to have spent an engaging hour in her presence. Here’s a small sampling of her formidable body of work… prepare to drool.

Via tanamachistudio.com

Tanamachi-01 Tanamachi-02 Tanamachi-03 Tanamachi-04 Tanamachi-05 Tanamachi-06 Tanamachi-07 Tanamachi-08 Tanamachi-09 Tanamachi-10 Tanamachi-11 Tanamachi-12 Tanamachi-13 Tanamachi-14 Tanamachi-15 Tanamachi-16 Tanamachi-17 Tanamachi-18 Tanamachi-19 Tanamachi-20 Tanamachi-21 Tanamachi-22 Tanamachi-23 Tanamachi-24 Tanamachi-25 Tanamachi-26 Tanamachi-27 Tanamachi-28 Tanamachi-29 Tanamachi-30 Tanamachi-31 Tanamachi-32 Tanamachi-33

Spring is in the air (sorta), and with summer just around the corner, we thought a beach-related post was in order. A favorite pastime of many is spending warm sunny days building sand castles on the beach. They take many forms, from bucket molds, to deep moat formations, to the ubiquitous drip castle. A Massachusetts artist simply known as SandCastleMatt creates incredible sand structures that stand out from the rest. What’s unique about Matt’s work is that his designs almost look organic, like they naturally emerge from the beach. Using found objects, like sticks, vines, wood and other repurposed junk, Matt builds a framework to support his structures. Then he employs the classic drip method, which conceals the bones of his impressive ephemeral work. a few years back, a viral photo mistakingly identified one of his structures as the result of a lightening strike in the sand, which was later debunked by Scientific American (here).

Via Flickr and Vimeo

SandCastleMatt-01 SandCastleMatt-02 SandCastleMatt-03 SandCastleMatt-04 SandCastleMatt-05 SandCastleMatt-06 SandCastleMatt-07 SandCastleMatt-08 SandCastleMatt-09 SandCastleMatt-10 SandCastleMatt-11 SandCastleMatt-12 SandCastleMatt-13 SandCastleMatt-14 SandCastleMatt-15

The worlds of fine art and digital art seem to be very slowly converging. There was a time not long ago when Photoshop “art” did not even exist, and traditional artists and art enthusiasts would have shuddered at even the thought. But technological advances, and out-of-the-box thinking have given rise to digitally produced works that are more than computer generated, but thoughtfully composed using time-honored techniques. Los Angeles-based digital artist and designer Anthony Gargasz is one such artist whose work seems to rise above. Gargasz’s thought-provoking series Metallic Faces takes an organic human form, and imposes mechanical attributes, with great effect, color and contrast. Fine, indeed.

Via anthonygargasz.com

Gargasz-01 Gargasz-02 Gargasz-03 Gargasz-04 Gargasz-05 Gargasz-06 Gargasz-07 Gargasz-08 Gargasz-09 Gargasz-10

Japanese sculptor Tomohiro Inaba’s unique approach is striking. Some of his work, consisting of steel wires of varying densities, almost looks like it’s moving. The subject matter of many of these pieces is animals… they start off in full form then dissolve into a tangled web of wire. Inaba achieves an awesome impression of movement, like an organic form transforming into a digitally knotted mass.

Via tomohiro-inaba.com

Inaba-01 Inaba-02 Inaba-03 Inaba-04 Inaba-05 Inaba-06 Inaba-08 Inaba-09 Inaba-10 Inaba-11 Inaba-12 Inaba-13

Unconventional materials used to create art may seem gimmicky and gratuitous to some, but in this case they add depth and interest to the work. London-based artist Carne Griffiths has mastered the marriage of calligraphy inks and graphite with liquids such as tea, brandy, and vodka. These exquisite and complex portraits (for sale here) involve highly detailed floral and organic flourishes layered with portraiture and other geometric forms. And all done without the aid of Photoshop. Griffiths’ eye for color and intricacy is quite something. Would love to see him illustrate narrative… his work seems to tell a story already.

Via carnegriffiths.com

Griffiths-1 Griffiths-2 Griffiths-3 Griffiths-4 Griffiths-5

Brooklyn-based sculptor Tara Donovan is known for transforming large volumes of everyday objects into incredible, impactful works. The sheer scope of her work seems to defy the laws of nature; piling, layering and bundling in almost organic forms that seem to bring to mind natural systems. These photos probably don’t even do her work justice. Donovan’s many accolades include the prestigious MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Award, among many others.

Via pacegallery.com

 

Photo 1: pins, toothpicks, glass; photo 2: adding machine paper; photos 3-4: buttons and glue; photos 5-6: polyester film; photos 7-8: styrofoam cups and glue; photo 9: pencils; photos 10-11: plastic drinking straws; photos 12-13: plastic cups

Donovan-01 Donovan-02 Donovan-03 Donovan-04 Donovan-05 Donovan-06 Donovan-07 Donovan-08 Donovan-09 Donovan-10 Donovan-11 Donovan-12 Donovan-13

%d bloggers like this: