Archives for posts with tag: paint

Just when we thought the golden age of music videos has passed and true innovation was practically impossible, enter Los Angeles-based pop/rock band OK Go, who have made a reputation for music video ingenuity again and again. Their latest two videos, “Upside Down & Inside Out” and “The One Moment” (both released within about the past 13 months) continue to push boundaries. The former is a gravity-defying feat via what is referred to as parabolic flight. Without knowing the context, one would think it was an exercise in CGI and green screen trickery. But what makes this gem of a music video so special is the fact that the video was shot in a single, 45 minute take. Then non-micro-gravity portions were simply edited out, for a seamless looking weightless romp to the song’s three-minute length. The latter, “The One Moment”, is touted with the distinct honor of “the shortest amount ever filmed for a music video.” The video uses just 4.2 seconds of footage, stretched out to the song’s full-length by slowing down portions by some 20,000 percent. Sounds pretty straightforward, but rest assured the logistics behind this were meticulously orchestrated by some super creative minds. OK Go is diligent about offering a behind the scenes look at these mini masterpieces, which just bolsters our assertion that some folks simply use more of their creative potential than others. We cannot even begin to wrap our minds around how one would even dream up these concepts, let alone bring them to life. But we’re certainly glad these guys did. In a single word: inspiring. Now watch the videos… okay, go!

Via okgo.net

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We’ve seen many reinterpretations of Disney characters and themes over the years (here and here and here), but nothing quite like Las Vegas-based painter Heather Theurer’s take. Theurer, who surprisingly doesn’t have a formal art education, takes it well beyond simply fan art. Her skill set and techniques are rooted in fine art, more specifically Renaissance painting, consisting of “a multitude layers of paint and glazes (as many as 20 or so in some cases) to reach the desired depth and detail that dominates her work.” Self-taught or not, Theurer creates some gorgeous work that has actually been commissioned by the big cheese, Disney, which is undoubtedly a great source of pride and validation. With such a deep catalog of characters and stories from which to draw, the possibilities for Theurer’s incredible series are endless.

Via heathertheurer.com

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Cubism, widely considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century, was pioneered by Picasso and Braque in the early 1900s. By definition, cubism is a style and movement in which perspective with a single viewpoint was abandoned and use was made of simple geometric shapes, interlocking planes, and even collage. Dutch artist Enno de Kroon takes this one step further, using the unique landscape of the universal egg carton to his advantage in what he calls “eggcubism”. de Kroon had always experimented with distortions of perspective, and he found that the egg carton as his canvas presented a new and unique challenge that forced him to approach painting in a new way. The challenge is not only limited to de Kroon as the creator, but the viewer’s perception is also challenged. de Kroon explains, “The waves of the egg cartons limit the viewer’s perception; they also make him aware of his positioning towards the image. The intentional limitation in subjective perception gives room for imagination and recall: the process of occlusion. By a fusion of direct and indirect perception conventional imagery is overtaken. At first sight this leads to a physical and mental incompleteness, that forces an integration which can only take place within the inner experience, apart from time and space. One could say that the complete image just emerges sublimated in the viewers mind. Gestalt psychology states that human perception aims for completeness. Perceptions are being added subconsciously. My eggcubist works evoke conscious and dynamic adding. The objects not only refer to themselves, they also refer to each other as a series.” In a digital age of augmented reality and immersive 3D experiences, de Kroon’s eggcubism pays homage to traditional cubism, with an interactive twist.

Via ennodekroon.nl and Flickr

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Manila-based art director/illustrator Patrick Cabral (also known as Dark Gravity) has a very eclectic portfolio. From illustration, to app design, to motion graphics, Cabral brings his a-game to each new project. As strong as all of his work is, we are particularly taken with Cabral’s typography work. It’s sort of refreshing to appreciate hand lettering in this increasingly digital age. And Cabral’s ornate work, complete with flourishes, swashes and filigree is among some of the best we’ve seen. Oh, and Happy New Year!

Via patrickcabral.com

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Relying on forms of matter (say liquids and fine solids like powder) in photography can be a very tricky proposition. So much could go wrong. But for London-based photographer Iain Crawford such carefully planned orchestrations result in some incredible photography. Crawford has a very adventurous spirit when it comes to his photography work. He is always looking to push boundaries by finding new ways of doing things. His images embody a beautiful (and unpredictable) kinetic energy that seems almost impossible to capture without digital facilitation of Photoshop. Crawford on his work with paint, in his own words: “I love the fusion between paint and model. The resulting shapes are as opulent as any piece of bespoke couture. The excitement and anticipation as we waited to see the next piece of unpredictable chaos was electric. There was something magical about how random chance materialized into beautiful images in front of our eyes.”

Via iaincrawford.com

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Istanbul-based designer/illustrator Selman HOŞGÖR has a distinctive collage style. We love how he merges vintage photography with illustration and typography. In less capable hands, this series could come across as rather pedestrian, novice work. But HOŞGÖR really hits the mark with these. Great balance of uniformity between each piece to come across as a true series. Could definitely see these evolving into other series… love his style.

Via Behance

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Swedish paper artist/illustrator/graphic designer Fideli Sundqvist has a superb style, and good eye for color. We particularly love her “Paint and Splash” series for its dynamic composition and inventive use of color. If her body of work is any indication, Sundqvist has a wide variety of interests and sources of inspiration. “I think you have to give yourself a varied life, expose yourself to different types of impressions. Mostly, I think it is the work itself that gives birth to new ideas. Desire drives the work forward, as I heard someone say on the radio, and that is so true.”

Via fidelisundqvist.com

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