Archives for posts with tag: pencils

In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Brooklyn-based sculptor Tara Donovan is known for transforming large volumes of everyday objects into incredible, impactful works. The sheer scope of her work seems to defy the laws of nature; piling, layering and bundling in almost organic forms that seem to bring to mind natural systems. These photos probably don’t even do her work justice. Donovan’s many accolades include the prestigious MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Award, among many others.

Via pacegallery.com

 

Photo 1: pins, toothpicks, glass; photo 2: adding machine paper; photos 3-4: buttons and glue; photos 5-6: polyester film; photos 7-8: styrofoam cups and glue; photo 9: pencils; photos 10-11: plastic drinking straws; photos 12-13: plastic cups

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Developed by Munich ad agency Serviceplan Group, this series of ads for Faber-Castell, known for its pencils, pens and other art supplies, is simple and effective. The concept is to show how true-to-life and authentic their colored pencils are. And we must say, they are executed beautifully. When an ad/campaign can stand on its own like these, we’d give it a thumbs up. We’d hang them on our walls. Love them

Via serviceplan.com

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South Carolina-based artist Jessica Drenk finds new ways to look at everyday objects. Her “Implements” series of nature-inspired sculptures consist of hundreds of ordinary pencils glued together. In her own words, Drenk says “By transforming familiar objects into nature-inspired forms and patterns, I examine how we classify the world around us. Manufactured goods appear as natural objects, something functional becomes something decorative, a simple material is complex, and the commonplace becomes unique.”

Via jessicadrenk.com

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