Archives for posts with tag: perception

If you were thinking of invading any given place, the use of balloons would not likely be involved. Unless, of course, you’re an artist with a statement to make. Such is the case with French photographer/artist Charles Pétillon and his “Invasions” series. Pétillon uses white balloons of varying sizes as a way to “change the point of view that we encounter every day without regard to it. It is our view that I try to sharpen and to move from a practical perception to visual emotion.” Pétillon essentially fills spaces, both architectural and natural, with said balloons. The resulting visuals become metaphors for various themes. The house overflowing with balloons, for example, is a metaphor for family memories that spring from home. Pétillon says, “The white balloons symbolizing childhood naivety. This metaphor allows to ask us about family memory. How is it spread? Is it a universal need?” Other pieces in this visually arresting series include “Play Station 2,” a basketball net symbolizing the video game universe, and “Mutation 2” DNA structure symbolizing genetic modification. It must have been quite a feat handling such a massive amount of balloons, and still making them look quite beautiful and surreal.

Via charlespetillon.com

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Snakes get a bad rap. And they have throughout history. Perhaps it’s their cold-blooded, slithering and hissing disposition, but snakes have long been feared and associated with evil. London-based photographer Andrew McGibbon attempts to change that perception with his compelling series, cleverly named Slitherstition. By photographing his serpentine subjects from overhead and on brightly colored backgrounds, McGibbon is able to capture them in a vulnerable state, and emphasize their inherent beauty and grace. McGibbon has a terrific sense of color, paring the reptiles with interesting, vivid background colors to compliment their almost graphic exteriors. McGibbon is also quite the articulate wordsmith, explaining this project in more depth: “While a great many species of animals are subject to projections of man’s metaphorical thinking, I don’t see another – not even venomous counterparts, like spiders or scorpions; or sharks which hide in murky depths, waiting (as the horror movies have us think) to rip us apart, which is thought of as so deadly and demonic. The snake is insidious, while the serpent is all-mighty and terrifying. From ancient symbols to pop culture and schlock horror, from Medusa to Freud, the snake is a single unifier, a common enemy unanimously held in hideous regard – it is, everyone agrees, evil. These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look, beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.”

Another snake-related post here.

Via andrewmcgibbon.co

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