Archives for posts with tag: photographer

Creative duo Michelle Maguire and Kelsey McClellan, otherwise known as Terrence Caviar, are a stylist and photographer team, respectively, whose latest project marries some of our favorites: color, series, and of course food. At its core, Wardrobe Snacks explores thoughtful pairings of various colors and textures. McClellan’s closely cropped photos perfectly capture Maguire’s monochromatic styling, all while touching on a familiar scenario: eating on the go. In their own words, Terrence Caviar describe the series in their own words: “Wardrobe Snacks was inspired by diners lacking the luxury of being seated at a table: Michelle’s stepdad who rests his sandwich on his thigh (hell with a plate!) in between bites while he blasts an action movie on his TV; a commuter cramped up on a crowded bus retrieving an item from a bag or pocket; a lunch-breaker on a park bench eating from her lap. They’re informal — perhaps even a bit awkward — spaces as far as eating is concerned, yet the diner always appears to be comfortable and perfectly satisfied with his chosen snack, almost zen-like.” Prints available here. More conceptual photography posts here and here and here.

Via terrencecaviar.com

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

A post shared by Sam Kaplan (@samkaplanphoto) on

Family resemblance is a curious thing. When two immediate family members look so much alike, it can be jarring. North Carolina bred, Arizona based photographer Bobby Neel Adams capitalizes on this phenomenon of startling likeness in his stellar FamilyTree series. Adams captures portraits of two immediate family members (usually mother/daughter and father/son pairings) dressed and posed similarly. Rather than a tidy side-by-side composition, Adams tears them down the middle, then places two halves together. This technique works so well, both conceptual and aesthetically. Well done.

Via bobbyneeladams.com

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It’s no surprise that we’re big fans of photographer Emily Blincoe (previous posts here and here). Blincoe splits her time between Austin (ampersand) Nashville, creating some compelling photography, that’s both thoughtful and fun. A quick look at her typographic ampersand series, now several years old and aptly titled “This Ampersand That”, is long overdue. We eat up (pun intended) series of this nature. Photography (ampersand) typography… is there anything better?

Via Tumblr

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Make no mistake, the captivating portfolio of Thailand-born, Sydney, Australia-based photographer/designer Peechaya Burroughs is no child’s play. Though her work is certainly whimsical and intrinsically approachable, it boasts no less artistic merit than fine art of a different nature. Burroughs’s minimalist approach to mostly hand-manipulated works is striking in a vast ocean of tricked out Photoshop work (which has merit in its own right, but the work of Burroughs is sort of refreshing in some ways). In her own words, Burroughs explains: “My photographs mainly consist of things that I create or manipulate by hand. Occasionally I use Photoshop when enhancing the idea and presentation of an image fits well. Driven by childhood memories and very much fascinated by children’s imagination and their quirkiness, the direction of my photography is light, easy to approach with a little touch of everyday optimism.”

Via peechayaburroughs.com and Instagram

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We’re not exactly sure of its origins, but perhaps you’ve heard of the folklore that claims dog owners begin to resemble their precious pooches over time. Hamburg, Germany-based freelance portrait, editorial and commercial photographer Ines Opifanti explores this notion in her ongoing series entitled The Dog People. While she’s not exactly sold on that claim, Opifanti does subscribe to the belief that owners become really good at interpreting their pets’ subtle mannerisms. We think Opifanti is really on to something with this… great series that could truly go on and on. It should be noted that these are authentic pairings of pet and owner, not models. Strong concept aside, Opifanti is clearly a very skilled photographer. Really nice shots. We love this all around.

More pet portraiture posts here and here.

Via ines-opifanti.com

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It was almost a year ago that we posted about an incredible collaboration between Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, makeup artist Veronica Ershova, and floral stylist Mikhail Kravchenko. They have teamed up again for a series of striking photos entitled Bloomshapes and Illusions, where they explore photographic portraiture adapted from a variety of influences, such as minimalism and symbolism. They even employ an element of illusion in their work, which makes it that much more special. Particularly notable is their use of flowers, like their remarkable Marge Simpson piece. Here, they employ brilliantly white blooms with great success. The attention to detail and sheer artistry that goes into these photographs is astounding, as exhibited in the video below. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again… can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

Via alexanderkhokhlov.com and YouTube

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