Archives for posts with tag: photorealistic

When we stumbled upon the work of Florida-based painter Matthew Cornell, we were really taken with his uncanny ability to paint water so realistically. But as we delved deeper into Cornell’s body of work, particularly his series entitled Pilgrimage, we realized there was much more to this talented artist. Sure, he has tremendous skill for painting in a realistic fashion, but there’s an emotional connection that one rarely captures in hyperrealism (some examples here and here and here). There’s something ethereal about Cornell’s work that transcends simply replicating a scene so well that it could be mistaken for a photograph. Perhaps it’s his own connection that comes shining through, but Cornell has a way of conveying real emotion with the notable absence of people. And we imagine this connection is even greater when viewing his extraordinary work in person. Don’t miss the trailer below to a solo exhibition last year.

Via matthewcornell.com

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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We’ve all enjoyed colored pencils at one time or another, but few pull off the depth and richness when utilizing these basic tools as Ontario-based illustrator/tattoo artist Andrew Wilson. Wilson’s creations are not simply sketches, but carefully crafted works of art that would make a digital illustrator envious. We love that Wilson creates these pieces by hand, and is able to achieve such contrast and nuance, especially in the shadows and highlights. And we’re not alone in our admiration of Wilson’s tremendous skills. His social media stats speak for themselves… 94,000 likes on his Facebook page, and 53,000 followers on Instagram. We will definitely be checking back on Wilson’s growing body of work, just awesome.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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The decorative art of mosaics dates back thousands of years, yet this art form never ceases to amaze us (here and here and here). Artists continue to find new ways to push boundaries, creating intricate photorealistic works with a variety of materials. One such master is British mosaic artist Ed Chapman. Influenced by artists like Chuck Close, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jamie Reid, Chapman works with a variety of materials to create some incredible pieces, often inspired by music, movies, and pop culture in general. One particularly notable piece is Chapman’s Jimi Hendrix portrait comprised of thousands of Fender guitar picks. It was auctioned off several years ago for £23,000 (over $37,000) at Abbey Road Studios in London as part of Cancer Research’s Sound & Vision fundraiser. Chapman also creates works commissioned by private art collectors and corporations from around the world.

Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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In this age of computer-aided design and art, we have a certain appreciation for good old pencil to paper. And if some of our past posts are any indication (here and here and here), we are really taken with what is often referred to as “hyperrealism”. So when we stumbled across the work of self-taught Ukrainian artist Kseniia Rustamova, we just had to share. Though she’s not being commissioned for big budget ad campaigns or high-profile gallery shows (that we know of), Rustamova’s talents in this field seem limitless. The details in her highlights and shadows really define her work… her subjects really pop off the page, and almost appear photographic. Really impressive.

Via rustamova.daportfolio.com

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New York City based artist Karla Mialynne is wildly talented. Her photorealistic drawings capture more than is thought possible with relatively simple tools. In fact, Mialynne was often asked how she does what she does, so she began laying out the tools she uses with each piece she creates. And this makes for a pretty impressive Instagram feed. The level of detail she achieves is astounding! Though she declares herself “just an average girl doing average girl things”, her work is anything but average.

Via karlamialynne.com and Instagram

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Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park is a bit of a perfectionist. His highly intricate work with wire mesh is breathtaking, and these photos probably don’t even do them justice. The videos convey the level of detail much better, but the process is best described as planes of wire mesh spaced several inches apart, over which Park superimposes a subject via a projector, then slowly prunes to reveal a stunning portrait. Beautiful and compelling work like nothing we’ve ever seen.

Via seungmopark.com and YouTube

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Okay, we clearly have a thing for photorealistic painting/drawing. This amazing skill and craft never ceases to amaze. And young Spanish artist Rubén Belloso is no exception. This 27-year-old virtuoso works with pastels to create these amazing portraits, and the details are stunning. See for yourself….

Via Facebook

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Dutch artist Ramon Bruin has the web abuzz with his spectacular 3D art. These photorealistic optical illusions involve a unique blend of drawing, painting and airbrushing, that makes the subject appear as if it’s jumping off the page. Impressive by any measure, but we especially like the apparent lack of computer work here. Makes them that much more special.

Via jjkairbrush.nl

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