Archives for posts with tag: playful

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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There’s “plenty” to love about the work of Argentinian designer/art director (and co-founder of Buenos Aires-based motion studio Plenty, and now at the helm of Playful studio) Pablo Alfieri. His vibrant and playful portfolio is crammed full of lighthearted designs that are heavy on conceptually and compositionally sound foundations. Though we don’t know him personally, we can safely deduce that Alfieri’s irreverent sense of humor shines through his fantastic designs. Be sure to peruse his robust portfolio, but we will simply leave you with a New Year greeting (yes, made from bendy straws). Hope you love Alfieri’s work as much as we do. Oh, and happy 2017 too!

Via Behance

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It’s a wonder we’ve never come across another photographer doing this, or perhaps it’s just never been done so well. We’re all familiar with Australian photographer Anne Geddes’s ubiquitous photos of sleeping babies. But Southern California-based photographer Laura Izumikawa takes a slightly edgier approach. What we imagine started off as the new mother’s inability to rest while her newborn daughter, Joey Marie, sleeps, Izumikawa channeled her stellar photography skills into a growing series that we just can’t get enough of. From Beyoncé to Pikachu to Sia to Cinderella, Izumikawa photographs her adorable (and cooperative) daughter in various states of costumed slumber. Not sure how long these brilliant cosplay (yes, a contraction of the words costume and play) photos can/will continue, but we urge Izumikawa to keep snapping a dozing Joey as long as she can. Brings a huge smile to our faces!

If you love these photos, check out a previous playful post (here).

Via Instagram

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Transforming everyday objects into art holds a special place for us. It harkens back to childhood thoughts, when our minds wandered while staring out the car window at cloud formations that looked like other things. Or when we’d doodle with no purpose other than to document our own whimsical musings. These days, artists apply conceptual thinking to this cherished pastime, and the results are often special and surprising (here and here and here). Included among those artists is German-born, Australian-based Domenic Bahmann (aka Domfriday). What started as a personal exercise in creative thinking has since populated his Instagram page, which piques the interest of almost 60K followers. And, in turn, has even led to retail opportunities due to popular demand (here and here). In his own words, Bahmann explains: “In 2013 I started my own creative challenge called ‘Stop, Think, Make’. I had to come up with a new image or illustration at least once a week. Since then I try to see the world in the way I used to when I was a child. Staying playful and curious isn’t always easy in our busy modern world.”

Via Instagram

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Japanese artist and student Hikaru Cho seems to employ her stellar artistic skills with a single purpose: illusion. Whether it be illustration, body painting, or sculpture, Cho aims to woo viewers with deception… in a (usually) playful, lighthearted manner, of course. Her work can be a bit unnerving at times… adding extra eyes, misplacing ears, etc. On the other hand, she also likes to play with food, disguising one food as another, for example. No matter that subject matter, Cho’s work certainly intrigues. Her personality shines through, which is impressive considering her tremendous skill set. It’s hard to believe she’s still a student! Cho certainly has a bright future ahead… we’re going to keep an eye on her.

Via hikarucho.com

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It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

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In much the same vein as the incredible work of Christopher Boffoli, Japanese artist/designer/art director, miniature photographer Tatsuya Tanaka’s playful take on macro photography is really memorable. Tanaka’s miniature dioramas, if you will, are almost like stepping into the mind of a young child, pushing his broccoli around the plate while his imagination runs wild. Tanaka says, “Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats. Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.” A key word here is everyday. Tanaka has actually committed himself to releasing one of these each day, a project aptly titled Miniature Calendar, and has been doing so since April 2011. Yes, everyday, folks. The body of work here is tremendous, and Tanaka’s perspective is fascinating. This is obviously just a very small sample of an incredible project that’s worth following. Just ask his impressive social media following: 35K on Facebook, 242K on Instagram, 88K on Twitter. Tanaka’s mission is simple: “It would be great if you could use it to add a little enjoyment to your everyday life.” We couldn’t agree more.

Via miniature-calendar.com

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Done well, photo manipulation can stop you in your tracks. Advances in software technology, particularly Photoshop, have allowed artists to explore surreal scenarios, once restricted to visions inside one’s head, like never before. The cultural and artistic movement known as surrealism began in the early 1920s, and arguably continues today to some degree, with the rise of said technological advances. One such artist engaging in making art that blurs the lines between dream and reality is Mumbai-based Anil Saxena. Saxena is particularly adept at Photoshop, and has a playful sort of style, but does not utilize his skills haphazardly. He creates thoughtful work, and is extremely detail oriented. In his own words, Saxena says “If the image is a success but my work goes unnoticed, I’m doing my job well.” We couldn’t agree more.

More current surrealist art here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Creativity manifests itself in different ways. We certainly appreciate well-planned, laborious works of art. But we also love seemingly effortless, spontaneous pieces that sort of continuously flow. German-born, New York-based Christoph Niemann is a prolific illustrator/artist, who bills himself as a visual story teller. And that moniker could not be more fitting. You may be familiar with his work, often featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The New Yorker, Wired, and others, as well as authoring a number of books. For his weekly Sunday Sketches series, Niemann employs mixed media techniques in some pretty terrific ways, then generously posts them to Instagram for general consumption. His use if everyday objects as part of his sketches is both clever and playful. Niemann seems to see the world through a different lens, creating design-envy worthy work with each piece. We’re definitely going to bookmark this and check back often. Well done.

Via Instagram and christophniemann.com

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It’s no secret that we’re really taken with work of Minneapolis-based art director/photographer/designer/creative genius Brock Davis (see previous posts here and here). Davis has an uncanny ability to transform everyday objects into something unexpected. Sometimes playful, or funny, or irreverent, or random, or plain silly… always a stroke of brilliance. This time, though, we stumbled upon his Instagram account, rather than his portfolio site. Davis delights his over 175,000 followers with semi-frequent visual gems… creative and thought-provoking mini installations sure to at least invoke a smile.

Via Instagram

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