Archives for posts with tag: portaiture

Resemblance is a funny thing (previous post here). Like the notion that cars have faces (here). Or the dog with a human face that has taken the internet by storm (here). Sort of along those lines, British photographer (and animal lover) Gerrard Gethings recently completed a series where he paired dogs and humans, and we absolutely love it. This series is so fun, in fact, that the concept actually derived from a commission by British publisher Laurence King Publishing for this brilliant little matching game (available here). Make no mistake, this was not an easy task. According to Gethings (and he would know based on his impressive portfolio), “taking pictures of animals is tricky in almost every way. I have never met one with even the slightest interest in photography.” Fortunately, we have a strong interest in this terrific and endearing series.

Via gerrardgethings.com and Instagram

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In honor of the fashionable social media practice of late, we are going to dip our toes in the “Throwback Thursday” pool….

Famed portrait photographer Philippe Halsman had a way with people, which certainly helped him build a body of iconic photography work. His conceptual approach to a medium that had been, up until then, largely used to capture reality was groundbreaking at the time. His collaboration in the late 1940s with surrealist artist Salvador Dali resulted in some of his most notable works. He later delved into perhaps his most famous series, Jump, in which he photographed movie stars, politicians, entertainers, artists, and authors to jump before his camera. In his own words, the late Halsman comments: “Starting in the early 1950s I asked every famous or important person I photographed to jump for me. I was motivated by a genuine curiosity. After all, life has taught us to control and disguise our facial expressions, but it has not taught us to control our jumps. I wanted to see famous people reveal in a jump their ambition or their lack of it, their self-importance or their insecurity, and many other traits.”

Via philippehalsman.com

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The faces on U.S. bank notes are so ubiquitous that we barely notice them anymore. But San Francisco-based artist James Charles is intimately familiar with the intricacies of U.S. currency portraits. Charles is a mixed media artist with an array of talents, one of which is illustrative portraiture. By sort of a happy accident — he began drawing on dollar bills for fun… what he calls “self-amusement” — Charles altered presidents’ faces in all sorts of ways. Before long, he had an incredible series that continues to grow. His attention to detail is nothing short of incredible, even modifying the lettering along the bottom of the note with the title of each piece. The subject matter ranges, which is part of the brilliance of this series as a whole. Though he never explicitly states it, Charles seems to be using his art as commentary for how pop culture is such a driving force in American economics today.

Via 333portraits.com and shootinggallerysf.com

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French illustrator best known as Yo Az has some excellent illustration skills, with an eye for details and texture. We really love his unique style… particularly fond of Kanye West and Paul McCartney pieces. Some prints available here.

Via Behance

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