Archives for posts with tag: publishing

Continuing the theme of our fantastic experience at Create Upstate last week in Syracuse (previous post here), we’d like to introduce you to Curtis Canham of CSA Creative Studio. Canham is an art director/designer/educator based in the Albany area with an impressive and diverse portfolio, from sophisticated packaging to illustration-driven infographics to consumer-facing web design. Along with running a full service design studio, Canham also finds the time to educate the next generation of designers as a design professor at The Center for Art and Design at The College of Saint Rose in Albany. With all of this important work, Canham, believe it or not, is also working on publishing a fundamental typography book. Busy guy, indeed. Last week, Canham ran a table in the marketplace at Create Upstate extolling the virtues of a-holes that quickly caught our attention. A-holes? What the what!? Canham drew us in with his impassioned discourse about his forthcoming book, A-holes: A Type Book. He enlightened us on such things as the anatomy of a-holes, historic a-holes, famous a-holes. and families of a-holes. All of this perceived potty talk may elicit gasps from those who don’t know any better. But being the typography nerds that we are, we, of course, understand and appreciate the double entendre. Aside from the obvious, an a-hole is also the negative space, or counter, within the “A” characters. Canham’s book taps right into a brand of humor we Barbour folk love. With only 5 days left, Canham is in the home stretch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a first printing of his 130-page book. Don’t be an a-hole… pledge a few bucks, please.

Via csacreativestudio.com and Kickstarter

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Gabe was particularly taken with all of this, and his name was fittingly drawn for an A-hole t-shirt at Create Upstate! In his own words, “you are what you wear.” Bahahahahaha!

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Voyeurism is a term we use loosely here, more referring to human curiosity than anything perverse in nature. But it seems to be the best way to describe the work of Dutch documentary photographer Reinier Gerritsen in his series The Last Book. Over the course of three years, Gerritsen trolled the New York City subway system, observing and documenting the printed matter commuters were reading. With the decline of physical books in favor of digital media, his original intention was to chronicle the waning days of traditional publishing: “Conceived as an elegy to the end of bound books, in a positive twist it has now become evident that people are moving away from electronic reading devices and that the printed book is alive and well!” With the rigor of a sociological experiment, Gerritsen catalogued hundreds of photos on his website by author’s last name. “It began as a series of modest observations and transformed into a collection of vivid documentary portraits, set against a visual landscape of best sellers, classics, romance novels, detective thrillers and every kind of printed book, as diverse as the readers.” Gerritsen took note of patterns, observing that Suzanne Collins, James Patterson and J.K. Rowling were among the most popular authors of choice. This project was eventually published into a beautiful bound book itself (available here), and Gerritsen even headed back underground to photograph commuters with their e-readers for his own digital publication, an app called The Last Book Revisited (available here).

Via reiniergerritsen.nl and saulgallery.com

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The shipping season has been hitting its peak over the past few days, so we thought it appropriate to share the typographic explorations of Barcelona-based design studio Lo Siento (previous post here). Among their highly creative undertakings are works in which they experiment with injecting colored liquid into individual pouches of plastic bubble wrap to form typographic figures. And these projects represent a larger theme in Lo Siento’s work: tangible typography. They are so in touch (no pun intended) with the nuances of letterforms, that they’re able to transfer that heightened awareness into physical objects, which is pretty astounding. We are sort of desensitized to design in some ways with advances in computer generated graphics, but when work like this comes along, it really catches our eye. Other works of Lo Siento’s include hand-formed muselet typography, cardboard typographic “skeleton”, and 4D letters, among many others. They are masters, and we really admire their work.

Via losiento.net

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Having created our fair share of infographics, we are fascinated by new and interesting ways to approach them. Austrian brand consulting and design firm Moodley Brand Identity has re-imagined what could be an annual report full of humdrum charts into compelling photographic compositions. The simplicity of text and image is graphic design in its purest form, and we applaud it.

Via Behance

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Word of this amazingly tiny tome broke this week, and we are fascinated. University of Iowa librarian Colleen Theisen recently stumbled upon the microscopic book, measuring just 0.138 inches square and 0.04 inches thick. Luckily the library, which houses more than 4,000 miniature books in its collection, recently purchased a microscope for its conservation lab. That was certainly put to good use to inspect this book, so small that it cannot be read by the naked eye. After close examination, the book was found to have originally been part of a two-book set (partial Bibles, actually), marketed and sold at the World’s Fair in New York in 1965 by a Japanese publisher.

Photos by Colleen Theisen

Via theatlantic.com

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We’ve always loved a good matchbook design. It’s sort of a lost art, really. When recent grad and Philadelphia-based designer Woody Harrington was asked to design a publishing piece for a series of flash fiction stories (basically a style of fiction literature of extreme brevity), he decided to turn them into vintage matchbooks. Harrington selected nine stories from Lou Beach’s “420 Characters” series, and turned each into a matchbook, deriving all design details from their respective story. The vintage feel seems authentic, and the way he transformed such a brief bit of writing into a tangible object is what design is all about. Big fans of this!

Via woddyharrington.com

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Okay, so this isn’t exactly graphic design or art, but certainly piqued our interest. In a sea of ebooks and devices dedicated to delivering digital books to hungry consumers, one publisher, Eterna Cadencia, has another innovation in mind. They recently released El Libro que No Puede Esperar – ‘The Book that Cannot Wait’, an anthology of new Latin American authors –  printed in ink that disappears after two months of opening the book. This all seems rather impractical (you’re left with a leather-bound blank book), but makes for a great marketing tactic. It creates a sense of urgency for consumers to actually read the book immediately, engaging readers in a new way. And the proof is in the pudding… the publisher sold out their first print run in a day.

Via huffingtonpost.com

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