Archives for posts with tag: realism

Imagine a post-apocalyptic world where social media companies are no longer the powerhouses they are today, but rather crumbling relics from the past. That’s exactly what self-taught Romanian digital artist Andrei Lacatusu envisioned when conceiving his arresting series Social Decay. Not only is Lacatusu’s technical skill amazing, but we love the concept, which flies in the face of all we know to be true at this present moment. And that’s what makes this series so striking. These logos, including Facebook, Google, and Instagram, are slick, closely curated marks that sort of define the current era. So to see them dilapidated, weather-worn and abandoned forces a double take, especially at this level of realism. Lacatusu’s perspective is provocative and timely, elevating this series well beyond a masterclass in CGI.

Via Behance

    

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When we stumbled upon the work of Florida-based painter Matthew Cornell, we were really taken with his uncanny ability to paint water so realistically. But as we delved deeper into Cornell’s body of work, particularly his series entitled Pilgrimage, we realized there was much more to this talented artist. Sure, he has tremendous skill for painting in a realistic fashion, but there’s an emotional connection that one rarely captures in hyperrealism (some examples here and here and here). There’s something ethereal about Cornell’s work that transcends simply replicating a scene so well that it could be mistaken for a photograph. Perhaps it’s his own connection that comes shining through, but Cornell has a way of conveying real emotion with the notable absence of people. And we imagine this connection is even greater when viewing his extraordinary work in person. Don’t miss the trailer below to a solo exhibition last year.

Via matthewcornell.com

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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Alright a lot have ask for different angle of the Starbucks drawing.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Working on a new drawing.✨😊#wip Full video on my Facebook page Ivan Hoo Art.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Detail.;] #BoykoKolev inspired piece..More progress on my Tumblr @ivanhooart.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

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In this age of computer-aided design and art, we have a certain appreciation for good old pencil to paper. And if some of our past posts are any indication (here and here and here), we are really taken with what is often referred to as “hyperrealism”. So when we stumbled across the work of self-taught Ukrainian artist Kseniia Rustamova, we just had to share. Though she’s not being commissioned for big budget ad campaigns or high-profile gallery shows (that we know of), Rustamova’s talents in this field seem limitless. The details in her highlights and shadows really define her work… her subjects really pop off the page, and almost appear photographic. Really impressive.

Via rustamova.daportfolio.com

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New York City based artist Karla Mialynne is wildly talented. Her photorealistic drawings capture more than is thought possible with relatively simple tools. In fact, Mialynne was often asked how she does what she does, so she began laying out the tools she uses with each piece she creates. And this makes for a pretty impressive Instagram feed. The level of detail she achieves is astounding! Though she declares herself “just an average girl doing average girl things”, her work is anything but average.

Via karlamialynne.com and Instagram

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What often sets an illustrator apart is style. And skill varies, of course. London-based illustrator/designer Alexis Marcou has the total package, so to speak. The level of detail and realism he achieves is quite remarkable, but his style is also extraordinary. In this self-initiated series spanning more than two years, Marcou captures something really special in four (very different) iconic musical artists. In his own words, “The biggest challenge in technical terms was to preserve the same style throughout even though the four main artists presented here are very different to one another. The whole idea behind this project was to create a style bold enough to fit any music artist without distorting his/her identity.” Seriously enviable work here, folks.

Via alexismarcou.com

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