Archives for posts with tag: remarkable

Posters are some of our favorite, yet challenging, projects. Poster design is a marriage between visual aesthetic and the delivery of information, between textual and graphical elements… the very fundamentals of graphic design. It should come as no surprise, then, that an institution as important and influential as the New York Film Festival places great emphasis on this visual embodiment of its annual event. Festival organizers manage to recruit some truly respected artists and photographers year after year for its remarkable posters. Below is just a sampling, starting with this year’s by renowned sculptor Richard Serra.

Via nytimes.com

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The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

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We’ve seem many artistic mediums, but never something quite like this. Some of the most recent works by artist Dino Tomic (aka AtomiccircuS) resemble chalk, but its actually… wait for it… ordinary table salt. Based in Norway, by way of Croatia, Tomic painstakingly arranges salt granules in such away that he achieves stunning variations of tone, giving these incredible Game of Thrones portraits an incredibly realistic feel. His beautifully intricate mandalas are also pretty remarkable. There’s simply no denying Tomic’s gift of visualizing his compositions, then slowly building them with his bare hands. And his 270,000+ Instagram followers would surely agree. Try to refrain from yelling at your screen when you reach the 1:07 mark in the video below. Now you can’t say you weren’t warned.

Via Facebook

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The connection between mathematics and art dates back thousands of years. From cathedrals to ancient tilings to oriental rugs, mathematics have been fundamental in geometric designs that are now revered and often emulated. In honor of Common Core testing that is taking place here in New York State this week, we thought it fitting to look at the work of Iranian mathematical artist Hamid Naderi Yeganeh. These often delicately intricate works are quite remarkable, and more astounding is that Yeganeh writes computer programs based on mathematical equations to produce them. Though Yeganeh’s mathematical descriptions are way over our heads (example below), the aesthetic and conceptual allure of these works is certainly not lost on us. The results are stunning, and just proof that math can be beautiful.

Via mathematics.culturalspot.org

 

This first image shows 9,000 ellipses. For each k=1,2,3,…,9000 the foci of the k-th ellipse are:
A(k)+iB(k)+C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and
A(k)+iB(k)-C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and the eccentricity of the k-th ellipse is D(k), where
A(k)=sin(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
B(k)=cos(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
C(k)=(1/14)+(1/16)sin(10πk/9000),
D(k)=(49/50)-(1/7)(sin(10πk/9000))^4.

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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Alright a lot have ask for different angle of the Starbucks drawing.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Working on a new drawing.✨😊#wip Full video on my Facebook page Ivan Hoo Art.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Detail.;] #BoykoKolev inspired piece..More progress on my Tumblr @ivanhooart.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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Long-term, intricate, handmade projects are not what we’re accustomed to at Barbour. But when we see such undertakings, we have a certain appreciation for them all the more. A superb example is this absolutely remarkable piece by Beauty & the Beast, a still production house, specialized in Ad Photography, Craft, CGI and Post-Production in the Eastern European country of Moldova. The project, entitled I Will Maintain, was inspired by Russian illustrator Ivan Belikov’s personal work interpreting various coats of arms (an intriguing series worthy of a post all its own). The folks at Beauty & the Beast spent a laborious six months planning, designing and producing this fine interpretation of the Netherlands coat of arms. And they did a fantastic job documenting the process. It should be noted that the hundreds of individual pieces were not crafted with a laser cutter or any type of machinery, but by hand. The multi-level assembly is just astounding, adding depth to an already complex work of art. We are truly in awe.

More papercraft posts here and here and here.

Via beautyandthebeast.eu

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The work of French sculptor Bruno Catalano is almost like an optical illusion. This series of arresting bronze sculptures depicts travelers, as exhibited by the luggage they are holding, and look of purpose, heading toward some unknown destination. But what is really remarkable about these pieces is what you can not see… the missing parts. Catalano creates these large figures with large (vital) chunks missing, which makes for truly intriguing work. In his own words (in loose translation): “It is no longer a man’s world, but the man in the world, yet full of culture but became brittle at the immensity. His quest will not be without damage. Man defragmented destabilized, stripped of his marks, he walks to his salvation as well as to saperte. Everything will now have reinvented. This traveler escapes from himself, to meet his unknown land.” Incredible, thought-provoking work.

Via brunocatalano.com and Facebook

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Australian artist Guy Whitby, otherwise known as WorkByKnight (or WBK) has a terrific eye for mosaic compositions, which (and we know from experience) is much more difficult and time consuming than it looks. These pixelated portraits are deceivingly complex, and serve as visual commentary for the global shift from analog to digital. Each piece is made up of a variety of computer keys, along with analog and digital buttons. WBK meticulously places each button and key to serve as a pixel, if you will. Though subjects vary, from celebrities and artists to musicians and political figures, to his most recent “Old School Tech” series of still life technological treasures, the quality of this remarkable work never falters. Truly amazing how strategic color choice and placement make otherwise analogous objects and shapes into something cohesive, and more importantly, recognizable.

More mosaic posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Arizona-based photographer Alex DeForest has a rather unique approach to portraiture. Though the medium of light painting is not a new one (can be traced back to American artist Man Ray’s 1935 series “Space Writing”), DeForest’s reclamation approach makes for some pretty remarkable pieces. In his own words, “I buy cheap flashlights at Walgreens, grocery stores, wherever. Often I buy fiber optic toys, disassemble them, and then connect them to flashlights to experiment. Occasionally I use pieces of acrylic and glass or even colored plastic handled cooking instruments.” The results are quite beautiful.

Via alexdeforest.wix.com and petapixel.com

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