Archives for posts with tag: renderings

While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via javitommasi.com and howww.com

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While we generally appreciate 3D rendering and the technology behind it, we must admit that extraneous use of it (which is rather rampant) is not only irritating from a conceptual standpoint, but also has a general desensitizing effect. So we were surprised and delighted to come across the work of Athens, Greece-based architect Katerina Kamprani. Her ongoing series, fittingly titled The Uncomfortable, explores the redesign of useful objects to make them uncomfortable to use. Kamprani purposefully and thoughtfully reworks each item in twisted ways. She states. “[I] decided to create and design for all the wrong reasons. Vindictive and nasty? Or a helpful study of everyday objects?” Whatever the motivation, we love staring at these, imagining how (un)useful each object would be, and the depraved humor that would ensue. We salute Kamprani for designing with purpose and humor, nicely done.

Some more stellar 3D work here and here and here.

Via kkstudio.gr

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Accomplished Singapore-based art director/designer Thomas Yang has two passions in life: design and cycling. Yang merges the two (quite expertly, we might add) by way of this ongoing collection of limited edition cycling-related prints, aptly titled 100copies (sold here). You don’t have to be an avid cyclist to appreciate this brilliant work from Yang. His process involves a strategic use of bicycle tires as stamps, essentially creating bold renderings of architectural landmarks from around the world. So far, Yang has produced four different architectural designs — “The Cyclist’s Empire” (Empire State Building), “God Save the Bike” (Tower Bridge), “Bicycle Mon Amour” (Eiffel Tower) and “The Unforbidden Cyclist” (the Forbidden City) — among other items, like posters, tees, stickers and tote bags. We’re looking forward to seeing what Yang comes up with next.

Via 100copies.net

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