Archives for posts with tag: science fiction

On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

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There has been a sort of renaissance of great movie (and TV) posters lately, and we’ve featured some of them here and here and here. Brooklyn-based studio SpaceWolf Limited takes the art of said poster design to another place (space, perhaps?) with their limited edition laser engraved wood posters. Yes, you heard that right… wood! Sure, this is a very niche product that seems geared toward (fellow) design/pop culture/sci-fi geeks. But there is a level of artistry and precision to be appreciated by just about anyone. We love the intricate details and beautiful contrast they achieve. Because these are (very) limited editions — just 50 hand signed an numbered pieces per design — the rotation of posters is constant. We look forward to future editions… these make great gifts (hint hint). Other products, including jewelry, journals and iPhone skins, available here.

Via spacewolflimited.com and Instagram

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It seems as if we are currently in the golden age of superheroes, at least if the release of major motion pictures is a gauge. These characters seem so pervasive in popular culture today, not just in the US but worldwide, that inspired works of art are almost inevitable. French photographer Sacha Goldberger really raises the bar with his phenomenal series Super Flemish. Goldberger uses not only superheroes, but also science-fiction and a few other characters from popular fantasies, and poses some intriguing questions: What if Superman was born in the sixteenth century? What if the Hulk was a Duke? How might Van Eyck have portrayed Snow White? And he answers them beautifully in this mashup of modern day superheroes, Flemish painting techniques and Elizabethan-era fashion. These works are really quite exquisite, and certainly thought-provoking. Well done, Mr. Goldberger!

This series is slightly reminiscent of work by British artist Steve Payne. More superhero related posts here and here and here.

Via sachabada.com

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There’s a lot of buzz surrounding the new Christopher Nolan science-fiction film Interstellar. Given the genre, and anticipation leading up to its release last week, it’s no surprise that a considerable amount of inspired art has surfaced online. Much of it is fan art, but these poster comps by Los Angeles-based designer/art director James Fletcher are more than that. Certainly a fan, but also an entertainment industry insider, Fletcher has loads of experience working in the field. And it shows. We love the variety of his layouts, and the level of detail he brings to the table. There’s nothing static about them… they could be part of the movie itself. These posters are impactful, engaging, and just darn good. Well done. Be sure to check out more of Fletcher’s stellar work.

Via dreamstateconcepts.com and Behance

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UK-based illustrator/designer Andy Fairhurst has amazing artistic abilities, specifically in the realm of what he refers to as “digital painting”, his tools of the trade being his iMac, digital pen and tablet. He also has a strong affinity for science-fiction and fantasy. Together these talents and interests have given birth to quite a body of work in a style all Fairhurst’s own. There’s a common stylistic thread throughout his works that we really love, and his sense of composition is particularly striking. Reimagining movie posters is a long tradition (as exhibited here and here and here), and Fairhurst’s work is among some of the best we’ve seen.

Via andyfairhurstart.com

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It’s not unusual for art and commerce to collide. But it’s certainly not always as awe-inspiring as this arresting piece from Vienna, Austria-based package designer and artist Gerlinde Gruber. Priding herself in creating “specialized packaging designs highly inspired by their contents”, Gruber is more intimately familiar with the intricacies of product packages than the average person. So it’s fitting that one of the world’s largest manufacturers of folding cartons, Mayr-Melnhof Packaging, commissioned Gruber to create a larger than life mural. Composed of more than 1,700 packages, this pseudo aerial view of a colorful cityscape is an exercise in color and form. Gruber also draws surprising parallels between packages and movies: “This model of an modern large city reminds us of the highly detailed city mock-ups which were made for such science fiction monster-movies, to be destroyed dramatically afterwards. Movies and packagings have many parallels. They pack contents to discover it to the maximum effect. Both are subject to trends, but always striking new paths to set trends by themselves. Brands and their products are showcased like movies and provoke customers emotions and reactions. The packaging is actor and stage at the same time. These cardboard boxes tell stories about the packaged product, such as houses talk about their residents.”

Via Behance

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