Archives for posts with tag: shadows

We are compelled to check in on the work of renowned Russian illustrator/graphic designer Eiko Ojala every so often (here and here) because he’s just so good. Ojala’s style is distinct… we now recognize it from a mile away. These are truly mixed media endeavors, mixing digital illustration, paper textures, and both real and artificial shadows. His adept sense of color, composition and depth are hallmarks of his incredible body of work, which includes illustrations for a variety of impressive clients including The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler Magazine, Herman Miller, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American Mind, Ebony Magazine and The New Yorker. Here’s a sampling of some of his more recent work, including a children’s book he recently illustrated (available for purchase here). Enjoy.

Via ploom.tv

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We’ve all enjoyed colored pencils at one time or another, but few pull off the depth and richness when utilizing these basic tools as Ontario-based illustrator/tattoo artist Andrew Wilson. Wilson’s creations are not simply sketches, but carefully crafted works of art that would make a digital illustrator envious. We love that Wilson creates these pieces by hand, and is able to achieve such contrast and nuance, especially in the shadows and highlights. And we’re not alone in our admiration of Wilson’s tremendous skills. His social media stats speak for themselves… 94,000 likes on his Facebook page, and 53,000 followers on Instagram. We will definitely be checking back on Wilson’s growing body of work, just awesome.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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Light and shadow are among the fundamentals of photography. Barcelona-based photographer/art director Pol Úbeda Hervàs created this series of photos that puts his own shadow front and center, as the subject of this intriguing work. Hervàs explains that these pieces are about identity: “How can we accept that we are changing? How can we accept we hardly recognize ourselves in certain situations? I am changing at this very moment of my life. I do not react in the same ways I used to. I am surprised. Is that me? These pictures are the way I see myself now. My shadow is there but I erase myself because I don´t know who I am any longer. The shoes remain only to make sure there is something more than… a shadow.” This may seem like a rather cerebral concept to some, but it really is quite straightforward. And executed perfectly by Hervàs. Well done!

Via Flickr

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Who says typography has to be pristine? Sometimes rough, fractured figures fit the bill. And we love this three-dimensional typeface from Auckland, New Zealand-based designer Scott Wheeler. The self-taught Wheeler designed these splendidly shattered letterforms as a self initiated project, but we’d like to see them applied out in the world because they’re too good not to. Though each figure is meant to be imperfect, we appreciate Wheeler’s attention to detail, like the subtle reflections and shadows. These fragmented forms really come together. Well done.

Via Behance

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In this age of computer-aided design and art, we have a certain appreciation for good old pencil to paper. And if some of our past posts are any indication (here and here and here), we are really taken with what is often referred to as “hyperrealism”. So when we stumbled across the work of self-taught Ukrainian artist Kseniia Rustamova, we just had to share. Though she’s not being commissioned for big budget ad campaigns or high-profile gallery shows (that we know of), Rustamova’s talents in this field seem limitless. The details in her highlights and shadows really define her work… her subjects really pop off the page, and almost appear photographic. Really impressive.

Via rustamova.daportfolio.com

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