Archives for posts with tag: simplicity

We have a certain fondness for Scandinavian design; what’s not to love when functionality and simplicity converge? These characteristics extend through many facets of design, including architecture, furniture, household objects, and, of course, photography and graphic design. So it’s no wonder we’re so taken with this series of photographs by Danish photographer Mikkel Jul Hvilshøj. Commissioned by iconic, high-end Danish housewares brand Eva Solo, Hvilshøj captured these fantastic “visual recipes” in such a way that they could honestly stand on their own based on artistic merit. Hvilshøj’s work elevates marketing photography to another level. We not only love the concept, but it’s executed brilliantly.

Via hvilshoj.com

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Bucking tradition, and just about every rule in a marketer’s playbook, global powerhouse brand Coca-Cola has taken a bold stance on topic du jour: equality and prejudice. In observation of the month of Ramadan in the Middle East, Coca-Cola has, for the first time in its storied 129 year history, stripped its cans of its iconic script logo in an effort to demonstrate a world without labels. Aptly titled “No Labels”, the campaign is sort of a social experiment to get into the minds of people regarding labels, preconceptions and stereotypes in general. Bearing nothing but its highly recognizable “dynamic ribbon” and the message “Labels are for cans not for people”, the limited-edition cans make a bold and beautiful statement. As designers, we are drawn to the visual simplicity juxtaposed with the powerful message. It’s actually rather telling of the current corporate branding landscape at large: businesses are opting to streamline their identities by making their logos simpler and flatter. Be sure to check out Coca-Cola’s masterful commercial to accompany the socially conscious campaign.

Via coca-colacompany.com

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Information design, though fulfilling when done effectively and successfully, can be a tedious task for the designer. Ryan MacEachern, a young UK designer and recent grad, seems to have a particular knack for this type of design, as evidenced by his outstanding project “Design x Food”. MacEachern explains, “A day before I was given a brief to present information on a personal habit over a period of a week I started a very bland and uninteresting low carbohydrate diet because I have previously been eating copious amounts of high fat, high sugar colourful junk food and needed to cut down to a strict diet plan. This project explores the nutritional values of the diet and presents it in a contrasting way, it juxtaposes the dull and boring appearance of the food I was eating by presenting the data using colourful vibrant foods, which were almost entirely excluded from my diet.” The simplicity of MacEachern’s layouts allow the subject matter to really shine and engage the viewer. Well done. He produced a perfect bound book and poster for the assignment. View the entire book here.

Via ryanmaceachern.com

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Having created our fair share of infographics, we are fascinated by new and interesting ways to approach them. Austrian brand consulting and design firm Moodley Brand Identity has re-imagined what could be an annual report full of humdrum charts into compelling photographic compositions. The simplicity of text and image is graphic design in its purest form, and we applaud it.

Via Behance

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