Archives for posts with tag: skills

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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Welp, UK designer/illustrator/artist Christopher LaBrooy has done it again. His mad CGI skills continue to amaze us. LaBrooy is a master manipulator, creating surreal digital compositions that defy logic and reason (previous posts here and here). Aptly titled simply 911, and set in what appears to be picturesque Palm Springs, LaBrooy pays homage to the iconic 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS in this incredible series. What we love most about LaBrooy’s work is that he elevates his adeptness in Maxon Cinema 4D beyond gratuitous rendering for the sake of rendering, to thoughtful and awe-inspiring artwork. Gearheads may shudder at the sight of a dozen otherwise pristine Porches partially submerged in a pool, but that’s precisely what LaBrooy seems to strive for: an emotional response to his digital work. As far as we’re concerned, mission accomplished (again).

Via chrislabrooy.com

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One mint Porsche 911 Carrera RS #porsche #porsche911 #bendy #animation

A post shared by Chris Labrooy (@chrislabrooy) on

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We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

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Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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Only an immensely talented illustrator could accept a challenge from a friend, and adapt his style so masterfully. This was exactly the case with Russian illustrator/designer/art director Viktor Miller-Gausa. He never really earned his stripes as a cartoonist per se, but when a friend said he could not draw a caricature, Miller-Gausa honed his skills by creating incredible portraits for 31 days of both his friends, and familiar celebrity faces. Here’s a sampling of Miller-Gausa’s awesome work.

Via Cargo Collective

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Full disclosure: we’re having a moment of design envy. And for several reasons. The subject of our aspirational glares is Big Apple-based designer/illustrator José Guizar’s self-initiated, ongoing weekly project Windows of New York. First, we are truly inspired by “daily” projects. We admire the commitment of artists who hone their craft through some sort of consistent work, whether it be daily, weekly, monthly (for example, here and here and here). It truly is a creative exercise, to motivate one’s self to conjure creativity for the sake of it, and at regular intervals, no less. Second, with distractions aplenty, from our Apple i-devices, to social media, to everyday hustle and bustle, being mindful enough to stop and appreciate architectural details around us is easier said than done. Such inquisitiveness and passion are what drives Guizar. Finally, his incredible illustration skills really make this project what it is. In the hands of a less-skilled artist, this undertaking wouldn’t be quite so notable. But Guizar’s spare, yet detailed design approach is perfectly engaging. From his flat style, to his terrific sense of color and composition, to his attention to typography, Guizar’s growing collection of diverse architectural specimens reflects his personal spirit of curiosity and exploration, and should be cherished and admired by designers for quite sometime. Hats off to Guizar for a well-conceived and expertly executed personal project.

Via windowsofnewyork.com

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