Archives for posts with tag: snake

There’s no denying our love for photo manipulation. With the right blend of humor and irony, this niche art form can really soar. Which is precisely the case for the work of California-based designer Randy Lewis and his This or That series. Lewis capitalizes on the power of juxtaposition with great success. And his Photoshop skills are not too shabby either. Following are a few of our favorites.

More photo manipulation here and here and here.

Via randylewiscreative.com

It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

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Ah, spring is (finally) in the air. A time-honored tradition for many, decorating eggs, is taken to a whole other level by truly skilled artists (here and here). Brooklyn-based tattoo artist turned fine artist Scott Campbell is among said artists, innovating egg decoration even further. In fact, “decoration” is probably much too casual a term… this is art. Campbell uses his exceptional illustration skills to produce graphite drawings inside ostrich eggshells. Mind blowing, we know. The intricacy of his work, and sheer beauty of his compositions, on what we can only imagine to be a rather trying surface, is awe-inspiring. Campbell’s subject matter of choice, not only with his eggshell art but throughout his body of work, focuses on the visual juxtaposition of life and death. Needless to say, we are absolutely taken with his work.

Via scottcampbellstudio.com and marcjancou.com and Instagram

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Snakes get a bad rap. And they have throughout history. Perhaps it’s their cold-blooded, slithering and hissing disposition, but snakes have long been feared and associated with evil. London-based photographer Andrew McGibbon attempts to change that perception with his compelling series, cleverly named Slitherstition. By photographing his serpentine subjects from overhead and on brightly colored backgrounds, McGibbon is able to capture them in a vulnerable state, and emphasize their inherent beauty and grace. McGibbon has a terrific sense of color, paring the reptiles with interesting, vivid background colors to compliment their almost graphic exteriors. McGibbon is also quite the articulate wordsmith, explaining this project in more depth: “While a great many species of animals are subject to projections of man’s metaphorical thinking, I don’t see another – not even venomous counterparts, like spiders or scorpions; or sharks which hide in murky depths, waiting (as the horror movies have us think) to rip us apart, which is thought of as so deadly and demonic. The snake is insidious, while the serpent is all-mighty and terrifying. From ancient symbols to pop culture and schlock horror, from Medusa to Freud, the snake is a single unifier, a common enemy unanimously held in hideous regard – it is, everyone agrees, evil. These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look, beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.”

Another snake-related post here.

Via andrewmcgibbon.co

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We are the first to admit that snakes in the wild and snakes in a controlled setting like a zoo, or through the lens of a talented photographer are two entirely different experiences. We certainly don’t love snakes in the way some people have them as pets. But we do recognize their undeniable beauty and mystique, especially when Italian photographer Guido Mocafico is involved. For his book Serpens, published several years ago, Mocafico captured a variety of snakes, including vipers and cobras, in these stunning photos. We have always found the vivid colors, remarkable patterns and graceful movements of these creatures beautiful and creatively inspiring. Mocafico shares a similar sentiment: “I have always been terrified by these reptiles, but I also find them terribly fascinating. I felt a sort of repulsion-attraction for these living creatures…. If I had to define beauty, I’d say it has to contain an element of darkness or danger.”

Via guidomocafico.com and hamiltonsgallery.com

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Vietnamese paper artist Nguyễn Hùng Cường does with folded paper what some artists do with, say, a paintbrush or pencil. His highly expressive form of origami is really remarkable. Featuring mostly animals, Cường’s body of work is like a masterclass in the art of paper folding. The level of detail he achieves is really quite exceptional. Check out some past origami posts (here and here).

Via Flickr

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