Archives for posts with tag: sneakers

In an effort to pay homage to some superb Italian design manifested widely through consumer goods, Italian-American designer Gianluca Gimini conceived this series of fictional co-branded sneakers. Looking at Gimini’s body of work, particularly this imaginative series, appropriately titled “Sneakered”, it’s clear that Gimini operates on a creative plane not easily defined. At a time when consumers (very broadly speaking) seem to be steeped in the marketing of nostalgia, Gimini capitalizes on that trend and also taps into a youth culture that holds footwear, specifically sneakers, in high regard. Think of it as an exercise in mashing up historical examples of excellent product design with a vehicle that has global youth appeal (sneakers). Brilliant.

Via Behance

gimini-01 gimini-02 gimini-03 gimini-04 gimini-05 gimini-06 gimini-07 gimini-08 gimini-09 gimini-10 gimini-11 gimini-12 gimini-13 gimini-14 gimini-15 gimini-16 gimini-17 gimini-18 gimini-19 gimini-20 gimini-21

On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

baker-01 baker-02 baker-03 baker-04 baker-05 baker-06 baker-07 baker-08 baker-09 baker-10 baker-11 baker-12 baker-13 baker-14 baker-15 baker-16 baker-17 baker-18 baker-19 baker-20 baker-21 baker-22 baker-23 baker-24

Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

Nyari-01 Nyari-02 Nyari-03 Nyari-04 Nyari-05 Nyari-06 Nyari-07 Nyari-08 Nyari-09 Nyari-10 Nyari-11 Nyari-12 Nyari-13 Nyari-14 Nyari-15 Nyari-16 Nyari-17 Nyari-18 Nyari-19 Nyari-20 Nyari-21 Nyari-22 Nyari-23 Nyari-24

Type geeks rejoice! We love inventive type, like this stellar work by Madrid-based art director/designer Andrés Momó. Fittingly for “DASHAPE” sneaker event in Spain, Momó literally threaded sneaker laces in the shape of letters to form the title of the event. The care he took with the letterforms shows. And somehow, this just wouldn’t be the same if it was digitally rendered… Momó taking the time to create this the old school way gets major props in our book.

Via Behance

Momo-01 Momo-02 Momo-03 Momo-04  Momo-08Momo-06 Momo-07  Momo-05Momo-09 Momo-10

Light and shadow are among the fundamentals of photography. Barcelona-based photographer/art director Pol Úbeda Hervàs created this series of photos that puts his own shadow front and center, as the subject of this intriguing work. Hervàs explains that these pieces are about identity: “How can we accept that we are changing? How can we accept we hardly recognize ourselves in certain situations? I am changing at this very moment of my life. I do not react in the same ways I used to. I am surprised. Is that me? These pictures are the way I see myself now. My shadow is there but I erase myself because I don´t know who I am any longer. The shoes remain only to make sure there is something more than… a shadow.” This may seem like a rather cerebral concept to some, but it really is quite straightforward. And executed perfectly by Hervàs. Well done!

Via Flickr

Hervas-1 Hervas-2 Hervas-3 Hervas-4 Hervas-5 Hervas-6

Folding paper in interesting ways is an ancients tradition, but also a favorite childhood pastime for many. Filippo Perin, paper artist of Phil Toys based in Conegliano, Italy, recently set out on a mission to collaborate with fellow artists and designers in creating paper sneakers for the Paperair Art Show. The results are fantastic, almost resembling those awesome baby sneakers modeled after adult versions, but with a cool, modern-art-meets-street-art twist. Perin basically developed a template and let the artists have at it. All who participated clearly had a great time… we love the variety of styles and influences. More paper art here and here and here.

Via Behance

Paperair-01 Paperair-02 Paperair-04 Paperair-05 Paperair-06 Paperair-07 Paperair-08 Paperair-09 Paperair-10 Paperair-11 Paperair-12 Paperair-13 Paperair-14 Paperair-15 Paperair-16 Paperair-17 Paperair-18 Paperair-19 Paperair-20 Paperair-21 Paperair-22 Paperair-23 Paperair-24 Paperair-25 Paperair-26 Paperair-27 Paperair-28 Paperair-29 Paperair-30 Paperair-31 Paperair-32 Paperair-33 Paperair-34 Paperair-35 Paperair-36

As designers, we notice all things design. And it’s everywhere. Literally. London-based illustrator/designer/artist (and sneakerhead) Stephen Cheetham has a keen eye for sneaker boxes. This series of prints (for sale here) explores the evolution of packaging for several revered sneaker brands. Would love to see Cheetham’s take on Puma!

Via stephencheetham.com

Cheetham-1 Cheetham-2 Cheetham-3 Cheetham-4

International visual firm Shotopop teamed with JWT Shanghai to take cardboard cut-outs to the next level. And boy, did they succeed. They were commissioned to develop and build three pieces, made up from the cardboard of shoeboxes, to represent three prominent Chinese basketball players, sponsored by popular Chinese sporting goods brand ANTA. Deservedly so, the project won an Outdoor, as well as a Design Lion at the International Cannes Lions Awards.

Via shotopop.com

Shotopop-1 Shotopop-2 Shotopop-3 Shotopop-4 Shotopop-5 Shotopop-6

Vancouver studio Academy created this excellent interface for Jordan/Nike’s “Love of the Game” campaign. We love the origami typography paired with clean photography and layers of origami design throughout that give it some depth. Well done.

Via weareacademy.com

%d bloggers like this: