Archives for posts with tag: special

When done well, reimagining movie posters (here and here and here) never gets old. Movie poster design presents a unique challenge to designers… it’s usually one of the first representations of a movie people see, so there’s a tall order to embody an often complex story with a single image. French designer and illustrator Flore Maquin is clearly up to that challenge. Maquin has a knack for designing movie posters extraordinarily well. We love her bold style, which is evident throughout her pieces. And she has a clear appreciation for typography. But it’s her genuine esteem for cinema that really shines through here. These creations feel like a labor of love, and that’s what makes them truly special. Well done.

Via flore-maquin.com

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A lot has happened in the world since we last visited the quirky and thought-provoking work of Atlanta-based BBDO Creative Director Stephen McMennamy. Yet his steadfast #ComboPhotos project continues to churn out clever mashups and engage people around the globe. In fact, as cited in our previous post (here) back in September 2015, he had almost 50K Instagram followers… well, his following has ballooned to 226K and growing. And for good reason. His compositions, which are all comprised of original, thoughtfully captured photography (rather than stock images) are simple and fun. Their brilliance is in their subtlety, and also the purposeful absence of Photoshop blending tools. McMennamy’s work makes us do a double-take, which is a sure measure of something special in our minds. His work is as impressive as ever… can’t wait to check back in another 16 months to see what McMennamy has conjured up.

Via Instagram

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Transforming everyday objects into art holds a special place for us. It harkens back to childhood thoughts, when our minds wandered while staring out the car window at cloud formations that looked like other things. Or when we’d doodle with no purpose other than to document our own whimsical musings. These days, artists apply conceptual thinking to this cherished pastime, and the results are often special and surprising (here and here and here). Included among those artists is German-born, Australian-based Domenic Bahmann (aka Domfriday). What started as a personal exercise in creative thinking has since populated his Instagram page, which piques the interest of almost 60K followers. And, in turn, has even led to retail opportunities due to popular demand (here and here). In his own words, Bahmann explains: “In 2013 I started my own creative challenge called ‘Stop, Think, Make’. I had to come up with a new image or illustration at least once a week. Since then I try to see the world in the way I used to when I was a child. Staying playful and curious isn’t always easy in our busy modern world.”

Via Instagram

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With summer almost upon us, we long for some beach days in the not-so-distant future. Which brings us to the awe-inspiring work of Australian seascape and ocean photographer Warren Keelan. If you’ve ever tried to capture photos of ocean waves, you know it’s no easy feat… much more difficult than it looks, with Mother Nature’s ever-changing variables, like motion and light, just to name two. But when done well, such images can be some of the most enthralling sights you’ll ever see. Keelan clearly has a gift, and seems at one with the mighty ocean, taking viewers on a journey and truly capturing the essence of the power and beauty of the sea. In his own words: “I’ve always had a fascination with nature, especially the ocean and its ever changing forms, and I am compelled to capture and share what I feel are special and unique moments in the sea. I love the raw, unpredictable nature of water in motion and the way sunlight brings it all to life, from both above and below the surface. For me, the challenge is creating an image that hopefully tells a story or leaves an impression on the viewer.” Keelan’s breathtaking work leaves an impression, no doubt about that.

Via warrenkeelan.com and Instagram

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Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

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