Archives for posts with tag: spectrum

Legos and art have been crossing paths for years now (here and here and here). These colorful bricks that come in a vast spectrum of colors inspire not only young children, but also creative-thinking adults the world over. We are in awe of this brilliant ad campaign for Lego from a few years back, featuring highly minimalistic configurations of single-stud bricks depicting some of the most iconic paintings by masters from da Vinci to van Gogh. The human brain is truly intriguing. The fact that most people would recognize these works of art, with mere hints of details, really is amazing when we think about it. Kudos to Milan-based art director Marco Sodano for the clever concept and flawless execution.

Via Behance

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Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

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On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

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Okay, this is admittedly rather geeky in a way only designers can appreciate, so we are naturally very taken with it. Berlin-based artist/designer/drinker James Edward Murphy developed this clock that corresponds the numbers of the time in a 24-hour clock with hexidecimal color values. Simple concept, but the result is sort of mesmerizing. Time-lapse visual here. Having used it for a little while, we love checking back randomly to see what color it is. To take things a step further, UK web guru Jonic Linley recently turned the clock into a Mac screen saver (download it here).

Via scn9a.org

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Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

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A favorite pastime of many, during the holiday season and throughout the year, is assembling jigsaw puzzles. Children around the world usually start with an elementary 24-piece puzzle, and graduate to more advanced puzzles containing many more pieces. Australian artist/illustrator/designer Clemens Habicht has created perhaps one of the most difficult (and beautiful) puzzles we’ve ever seen. Even we as designers, who have a bit of an edge given our intimate knowledge in the nuances of color, see this is quite daunting. Rather than recreating an image, this puzzle requires you to assemble the pieces based on a CMYK color gamut. That’s right, a 1,000-piece puzzle made up of simple 1,000 different colored pieces. In his own words, Habicht discusses: “The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of color, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details. What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.” Sweet satisfaction, indeed. If/when we tackle this, we will be sure to post the result!

Via Tumblr and lamingtondrive.com

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As technology advances, so too does our ability to track motion, as is exhibited by the iPhone, Fitbit, forthcoming Apple Watch, and others. But Canadian Stephen Orlando is more fixated with the beauty of motion, and innovative ways to capture it visually. Orlando, a mechanical engineer by trade, blurs the line between science and art in his stunning ongoing series Motion Exposure. By utilizing programmable LED lights and long exposure photography, Orlando is “able to tell the story of movement.” Though we’ve featured light painting before (here and here), Orlando’s work is a bit different. We love the spectrum of colors and intriguing patterns of motion he captures. In his own words, Orlando says “I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph…. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.” This growing series features motion captured by kayaking, canoeing, soccer, tennis, swimming and even waterfalls, and more. Absolutely beautiful.

Via motionexposure.com

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Part photojournalism, part fine art photography, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s “Aerial Views Adria” project plays to a variety of senses. These extraordinary photographs not only satisfy our own desire for visual symmetry and orderliness, they also feature a pleasing spectrum of colors. Perhaps the most amazing thing about this series is that it’s not Photoshopped. Lang captured authentic aerial views of seaside resorts at the Adriatic coastline in Italy, between Ravenna and Rimini. Be sure to check out his body of work, it’s really quite something.

Via bernhardlang.de and Behance

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It’s not unusual for art and commerce to collide. But it’s certainly not always as awe-inspiring as this arresting piece from Vienna, Austria-based package designer and artist Gerlinde Gruber. Priding herself in creating “specialized packaging designs highly inspired by their contents”, Gruber is more intimately familiar with the intricacies of product packages than the average person. So it’s fitting that one of the world’s largest manufacturers of folding cartons, Mayr-Melnhof Packaging, commissioned Gruber to create a larger than life mural. Composed of more than 1,700 packages, this pseudo aerial view of a colorful cityscape is an exercise in color and form. Gruber also draws surprising parallels between packages and movies: “This model of an modern large city reminds us of the highly detailed city mock-ups which were made for such science fiction monster-movies, to be destroyed dramatically afterwards. Movies and packagings have many parallels. They pack contents to discover it to the maximum effect. Both are subject to trends, but always striking new paths to set trends by themselves. Brands and their products are showcased like movies and provoke customers emotions and reactions. The packaging is actor and stage at the same time. These cardboard boxes tell stories about the packaged product, such as houses talk about their residents.”

Via Behance

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It’s been about one year since we last checked in on Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe and her satisfyingly organized compositions (here). This time, her focus has shifted from colorful confections to a variety of flowers, fruits and vegetables. These high angle shots are an exercise in organized groupings of size and shape, but also color. There’s no denying that these creations indulge our inner obsessive-compulsive side.

Via emilyblincoe.com

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