Archives for posts with tag: still life

Italian photographer Dan Bannino is a consummate storyteller with a particular penchant for still life and commercial photography. Much of his work could just as easily find a home on a gallery wall as in the pages of a mass market magazine, like National Geographic, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Cosmopolitan and many others. With his terrific Power and Food series, Bannino explores the eating habits of powerful and influential people from around the world. In our celebrity-obsessed culture any glimpse “behind the curtain,” so to speak, is valued. A look into the private lives of public figures, no matter how brief or inconsequential, makes us feel a little closer to them. Bannino’s series capitalizes on that curiosity, with his vibrant and arresting images. We particularly love his compositions and bold style. In his own words, Bannino states, “If you’re a fast food aficionado or a pizza freak, you have more in common with Mr. Donald J. Trump, and Pope Francis himself than you ever imagined. Check out some of the most unexpected food patterns of the world’s leaders, and you’ll never eat the same way again.”

Via danbannino.com

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While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

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Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

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In addition to being aesthetically innovative, Torino, Italy-based photographer Giorgio Cravero’s series, entitled simply Colors, is also fueled by a belief that we humans are slowly killing nature’s bounty. Cravero shot the fruits and vegetables, then masterfully retouched them to look like the life (color) is dripping away. “Men are poison for the earth. Behind this work there’s the story of what we are and of our arrogance when we think that we really count…. Here, in that cabbage which was sadly left to its fate, lies all the tragic meaning of our smallness and of our short memory, because we should have stayed there, close and loyal to the Earth, we should have stayed humble.” Though we may not totally agree with Cravero’s sullen position, we understand the sentiment. And there’s certainly no denying his immense talent and superb execution of these photographs.

Via Behance

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In this age of computer-aided design and art, we have a certain appreciation for good old pencil to paper. And if some of our past posts are any indication (here and here and here), we are really taken with what is often referred to as “hyperrealism”. So when we stumbled across the work of self-taught Ukrainian artist Kseniia Rustamova, we just had to share. Though she’s not being commissioned for big budget ad campaigns or high-profile gallery shows (that we know of), Rustamova’s talents in this field seem limitless. The details in her highlights and shadows really define her work… her subjects really pop off the page, and almost appear photographic. Really impressive.

Via rustamova.daportfolio.com

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The talent coming out of Savannah College of Art and Design is quite remarkable. And the work of SCAD senior Weston Doty, currently studying Graphic Design and Photography, is particularly notable. We’re especially taken with Doty’s project titled Split, which he describes as “observation & experimentation of form + color”. We admit that we have an affinity for food-related design (as evidenced here and here and here), but Doty’s keen sense of color and composition are what really draw us to this series. Doty exhibits an air of design maturity in his work, and we imagine he will be making his mark in the design community for years to come (his terrific name can’t hurt either).

Via Behance

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Brooklyn-based photographer Daniel Kukla’s series, The Edge Effect, is really intriguing. Upon being awarded an artist’s residency by the United States National Park Service in southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park, Kukla photographed square mirrors propped on easels to catch the reflection of the horizon behind him. Drawing from his background in biology and anthropology, Kukla’s series takes its title from an ecological term of the same name that describes the juxtaposition of two contrasting environments. And Kukla captures these contrasts beautifully.

Via danielkukla.com

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