Archives for posts with tag: street art

We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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Graffiti by its very nature changes the appearance of the surface on which it is displayed. But what happens when the “graffiti” itself continually changes as well? Delhi, India-based graffiti artist Daku (which literally means “bandit” or “dacoit” in Hindi… clearly a reference to the outlaw nature of graffiti art itself) explores this concept with his absolutely brilliant piece Time Changes Everything. Technically more public art than graffiti, Daku worked with St+art India Foundation, a non-profit organization that works on art projects in public spaces with accessibility of art as the main goal. Daku’s innovative work is basically a typographic sundial, where thoughtfully chosen words associated with change over the passage of time cast a shadow on a building’s facade by way of sunlight. From conception to execution, we are absolutely taken with this project. Mystery surrounding Daku’s actual identity may be part of his allure, but his overwhelming talent is crystal clear.

Via st-artindia.org and Instagram (daku156 and startindia)

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Fresh on the minds of Americans in this spirited election season, and following last night’s first presidential debate, Donald Trump has firmly cemented his Q Rating (whether favorable or not) into the public consciousness. It should come as no surprise, then, when artwork reflects current affairs (related posts here and here). We’ve discussed the awesome and thought-provoking work of Brazilian artist Butcher Billy not long ago (here), and thought it fitting to share his recent series featuring Trump. Butcher Billy’s skill is clear, and this homage to Belgian surrealist René Magritte, aptly titled Trump X Magritte: The Surrealist Series, draws on his keen sense of color and composition. As Butcher Billy says himself, “Because nothing is more surreal than The Donald.”

Via Behance

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Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

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Given all the snow in the news lately, we thought it fitting to peek at the work of street artist simply known as Faust. Paying homage to a favorite pastime for most who have grown up with even semi-snowy winters, he brings his impeccable calligraphy skills to snow-covered surfaces in a series he calls Snow Script. Faust fuels that childlike urge to run his fingers through the snow by stealthily adorning surfaces after a fresh snowfall with his stellar typography, then documenting it. Be sure to check out the rest of his killer work for an impressive roster of clients, including a mural just a stone’s throw away from our Rochester studio (photos below).

Not exactly the same, but vaguely reminiscent post here

Via Behance

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Art with purpose and for social good can be really powerful. It can bring people together in unique ways that’s really touching, especially in this digitally connected, yet ironically isolating society we live in today. The work of Germen Crew, a Mexican youth organization comprised of muralists and street artists, to literally transform a village is a prime example. The government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself resulted in this magnificent mural, Mexico’s largest. Launched as an effort to not only rehabilitate the hillside neighborhood, but to also bring the community together, the Germen Crew project was a massive undertaking involving the painting of 209 individual houses. And the photos speak for themselves. Be sure to check out the video below (in Spanish). The vibrant, fluid composition seen from afar is truly awe-inspiring and heart warming. Just amazing.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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Given the somber mood surrounding all things politics and money in Europe, particularly Greece, this installation street art, fittingly titled “Crisis”, is especially relevant. Conceived and created by Madrid-based artist SpY, and installed in a central neighborhood in the city of Bilbao, the piece consists of 1000€ (almost $2,000) in 2 cent coins making up the word “CRISIS” on an outdoor wall. Not totally surprising, passersby helped themselves to the money, and all the coins disappeared in less than 24 hours. In some ways, that feels like blatant defacing of public art, but in other ways, that was likely expected and part of the point to begin with. SpY seems very much in touch with the political climate around him, and we love his out-of-the-box creativity. There’s good reason he’s been making such relevant urban art since the mid-eighties. In his own words, his work “involves the appropriation of urban elements through transformation or replication, commentary on urban reality, and the interference in its communicative codes…. a parenthesis in the automated inertia of the urban dweller. They are pinches of intention, hidden in a corner for whoever wants to let himself be surprised. Filled with equal parts of irony and positive humor, they appear to raise a smile, incite reflection, and to favor an enlightened conscience.”

Via spy-urbanart.com

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The old adage “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” is taken to the hilt by Portuguese street artist Artur Bordalo (aka Bordalo II). Bordalo is a master of mixed media, and his work not only repurposes/recycles “garbage”, but also transforms urban landscapes in really intriguing ways. Bordalo sees the world through a different lens, and uses his bare hands to help us see what he sees through figurative painting. Bordalo combs the streets of Lisbon for discarded items, turning them into large scale thought-provoking compositions. In his own words, his artwork “is not only a way to recycle, but also a critique of the world we live in, where we often have nice things, which are based on junk without realizing it.” We particularly love his bird and insect works, as well as his train track transformations, featured below.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via bordalosegundo.com and Instagram

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A quick shoutout to one of out favorite graffiti artists around, ROA. It’s been a while since we posted (here) about this wildly talented Belgian artist. His signature black and white large-scale works featuring animals, often of the scavenger variety, are visually arresting. Some find ROA’s work grotesque, but he cites his fascination with the circle of life, and the beauty in the rhythm of life and death, as his inspiration. We are particularly taken with his imaginative use of space (lenticular rabbit!), and how that advances his art to another level, as exhibited in the particular works below. Be sure to check out the video too. And look out for ROA’s work near you… our Rochester studio has the distinct privilege of being just a mile and a half from one of his murals.

Via Flickr

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