Archives for posts with tag: style

Our penchant for serial works never diminishes. There’s just something about the natural order of things that is so satisfying. Glasgow-based illustrator/designer Jack Daly taps into that systemization while exploring his love of illustration, typography, and travel with his aptly titled Wanderlust Alphabet. And we have to say, the results, so far, are pretty great. It goes without saying that Daly is a terrific artist, and his adept use of color and sense of composition really make each of these pieces sing. Having just tackled the very beginning of the alphabet so far, Daly differentiates each letter/city with signature landmarks, architecture, local customs, etc. We are really taken with Daly’s style and cannot wait to see this alphabet grow. The possibilities are endless! In the meantime, prints available here.

Via Behance and Instagram

We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

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Tourism marketing is not something that we think of as terribly design-y. We just assume the process involves input from many people and interests, and therefor gets boiled way down from the designer’s original vision. But in the case of a Smoky Mountain Tourism campaign from several years back by Tennessee-based designer/creative director Shayne Ivy, that vision seems to have won out for the most part. We love Ivy’s style here, which lends itself really well to the concept and is beautifully executed. It’s even a bit reminiscent of other multiple exposure work (here and here), and most notably that by the great Olly Moss (here), which is certainly the highest compliment. It appears that Smoky Mountain Tourism has since shelved this campaign, but a resurrection may be in order… Ivy’s double exposure silhouette concept and treatments are far superior in our mind.

Via Behance

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On this Election Day eve, perhaps the most historic U.S. election in our lifetime, a large swath of the population is bound to be unsatisfied with the outcome. With that in mind, we bring you a short video by Paris-based motion design studio Parallel that’s both amusing and unnerving. Though it has no relation to the election itself, it’s a terrifically animated short about everyday situations that are simply unsatisfying. The appeal of this video is twofold for us: not only is it highly relatable (we can honestly say that we’ve felt the frustration of every scenario depicted), but the quality of the work, from the overall style, use of color, animation and sound design, are totally on point. Having realized they really tapped into something, Parallel Studio is now conducting a challenge (here) to fellow animators no matter their skill level, to submit creative takes on other unsatisfying situations.

Via parallelproduction.tv

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We are compelled to check in on the work of renowned Russian illustrator/graphic designer Eiko Ojala every so often (here and here) because he’s just so good. Ojala’s style is distinct… we now recognize it from a mile away. These are truly mixed media endeavors, mixing digital illustration, paper textures, and both real and artificial shadows. His adept sense of color, composition and depth are hallmarks of his incredible body of work, which includes illustrations for a variety of impressive clients including The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler Magazine, Herman Miller, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American Mind, Ebony Magazine and The New Yorker. Here’s a sampling of some of his more recent work, including a children’s book he recently illustrated (available for purchase here). Enjoy.

Via ploom.tv

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We have a certain fondness for Scandinavian design; what’s not to love when functionality and simplicity converge? These characteristics extend through many facets of design, including architecture, furniture, household objects, and, of course, photography and graphic design. So it’s no wonder we’re so taken with this series of photographs by Danish photographer Mikkel Jul Hvilshøj. Commissioned by iconic, high-end Danish housewares brand Eva Solo, Hvilshøj captured these fantastic “visual recipes” in such a way that they could honestly stand on their own based on artistic merit. Hvilshøj’s work elevates marketing photography to another level. We not only love the concept, but it’s executed brilliantly.

Via hvilshoj.com

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Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

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Though recent weather patterns may suggest otherwise, summer is merely a fleeting memory, with that autumn feeling fast approaching. We recently stumbled upon the phenomenal work of Madrid-based studio Serial Cut, and more particularly a video they created for fashion/style giant DIESEL (who we are also especially fond of), that harkens back to those sultry summer days in the not so distant past. Showcasing their Spring/Summer collection, DIESEL commissioned Serial Cut to create this glossy, gravity defying promo loop, Melting Props, to display in store windows. We often find ourselves in awe of really well executed 3D/CGI work (here and here and here)… and Serial Cut’s work is among the best we’ve seen. In their own words: “A digital celebration of summer featuring pieces from this collection, including footwear, sunglasses, and bags, all inhabiting a glossy landscape. An ice cream cone, surfboard, and basketball all melt and dripping in the heat, encapsulated in a candy coating that shimmers through a rainbow of blues, greens, and pinks, with movements emphasizing the suspension of natural law as texture. Get into a surreal summer immersion, where gravity is merely a suggestion!”

Via serialcut.com

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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Only an immensely talented illustrator could accept a challenge from a friend, and adapt his style so masterfully. This was exactly the case with Russian illustrator/designer/art director Viktor Miller-Gausa. He never really earned his stripes as a cartoonist per se, but when a friend said he could not draw a caricature, Miller-Gausa honed his skills by creating incredible portraits for 31 days of both his friends, and familiar celebrity faces. Here’s a sampling of Miller-Gausa’s awesome work.

Via Cargo Collective

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