Archives for posts with tag: style

Only an immensely talented illustrator could accept a challenge from a friend, and adapt his style so masterfully. This was exactly the case with Russian illustrator/designer/art director Viktor Miller-Gausa. He never really earned his stripes as a cartoonist per se, but when a friend said he could not draw a caricature, Miller-Gausa honed his skills by creating incredible portraits for 31 days of both his friends, and familiar celebrity faces. Here’s a sampling of Miller-Gausa’s awesome work.

Via Cargo Collective

Miller-Gausa-01 Miller-Gausa-02 Miller-Gausa-03 Miller-Gausa-04 Miller-Gausa-05 Miller-Gausa-06 Miller-Gausa-07 Miller-Gausa-08 Miller-Gausa-09 Miller-Gausa-10 Miller-Gausa-11 Miller-Gausa-12 Miller-Gausa-13 Miller-Gausa-14 Miller-Gausa-15 Miller-Gausa-16 Miller-Gausa-17 Miller-Gausa-18 Miller-Gausa-19 Miller-Gausa-20

Advertisements

Few athletes are as globally recognizable as icon David Beckham. Even here in the U.S. where soccer is not nearly the sports juggernaught that it is just about everywhere else on the planet, Beckham is a mainstay in the fabric of our vast celebrity culture. So it was fitting that the Bleacher Report recently commissioned artists to create unique illustrations of the soccer superstar to mark his 40th birthday. We really love the diversity of styles here. We won’t mention our favorites, but it’s safe to say that they are all pretty fantastic in their own way. These assorted artists, whose backgrounds and influences are as distinct as their artistic styles, include Steve Welsh (UK); Alexis Marcou (New York City), previous post here; Sebastián Domenech (Buenos Aires); Dave Merrell (UK), previous post here; Brandon Spahn (Bloomington, Indiana); Bram Vanhaeren (Belgium); Nikkolas Smith (Los Angeles); Melvin Rodas (Philippines); Rory Martin (San Francisco); Gabriel De Los Rios (New York City); James White (Nova Scotia).

Via Bleacher Report

Beckham-01 Beckham-02 Beckham-03 Beckham-04 Beckham-05 Beckham-06 Beckham-07 Beckham-08 Beckham-09 Beckham-10 Beckham-11

The landing page of Baltimore-based artist Joshua Budich’s website simply states “born to illustrate.” That’s a loaded declaration, but Budich certainly has the goods to back it up. His eclectic body of work is quite impressive, with an obvious love for pop culture. His style is reminiscent of comic book art, which lends itself to his familiar subjects from television, movies and music. Budich relies heavily on line work, and achieves some great, expressive details without overdoing it, or looking like he simply traced celebrities. He also has a great eye for composition and color, making his work recognizable now that we’re familiar with it (prints for sale here).

Via joshuabudich.com

Budich-01 Budich-02 Budich-03 Budich-04 Budich-05 Budich-06 Budich-07 Budich-08 Budich-09 Budich-10 Budich-11 Budich-12 Budich-13 Budich-14 Budich-15 Budich-16 Budich-17 Budich-18 Budich-19 Budich-20 Budich-21 Budich-22 Budich-23 Budich-24 Budich-25 Budich-26

Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

Hunter-01 Hunter-02 Hunter-03 Hunter-04 Hunter-05 Hunter-06 Hunter-07 Hunter-08 Hunter-09 Hunter-10 Hunter-11 Hunter-12 Hunter-13 Hunter-14 Hunter-15 Hunter-16 Hunter-17 Hunter-18 Hunter-19 Hunter-20 Hunter-21 Hunter-22 Hunter-23 Hunter-24 Hunter-25 Hunter-26Hunter-27 Hunter-28 Hunter-29 Hunter-30

As designers, we notice all things design. And it’s everywhere. Literally. London-based illustrator/designer/artist (and sneakerhead) Stephen Cheetham has a keen eye for sneaker boxes. This series of prints (for sale here) explores the evolution of packaging for several revered sneaker brands. Would love to see Cheetham’s take on Puma!

Via stephencheetham.com

Cheetham-1 Cheetham-2 Cheetham-3 Cheetham-4

Italian illustrator/designer Alberto Seveso employs some awesome Photoshop skills to merge contrasting textures for a very distinct design style. We’ve featured his work before, but had to share some of his latest work. From album artwork, to packaging for Adobe, Seveso is a true master of digital art. He brings a certain beauty and elegance to the medium. Incredible design inspiration.

Via burdu976.com

Seveso-01 Seveso-02 Seveso-03 Seveso-04 Seveso-05 Seveso-06 Seveso-07 Seveso-08 Seveso-09 Seveso-10 Seveso-11 Seveso-12 Seveso-13 Seveso-14 Seveso-15 Seveso-16 Seveso-17 Seveso-18

Israeli-born, London-based graphic designer Noma Bar has a very specific style. Use of negative space may look simple or straightforward to most, but as any designer will tell you, to employ it really effectively is no easy task. And negative space is the cornerstone of Bar’s style, which is really saying something. Perhaps one of the best examples of Bar’s masterful work is an IBM campaign from a few years back, which is sure to be studied by designers for many decades to come. In his own words, Bar’s general philosophy is “maximum communication with minimum elements.” And IBM clearly (and smartly) tapped Bar for its Smarter Planet campaign for that very reason.

Via dutchuncleagency.blogspot.com

Bar-01 Bar-02 Bar-03 Bar-04 Bar-05 Bar-06 Bar-07 Bar-08 Bar-09 Bar-10 Bar-11

Swedish paper artist/illustrator/graphic designer Fideli Sundqvist has a superb style, and good eye for color. We particularly love her “Paint and Splash” series for its dynamic composition and inventive use of color. If her body of work is any indication, Sundqvist has a wide variety of interests and sources of inspiration. “I think you have to give yourself a varied life, expose yourself to different types of impressions. Mostly, I think it is the work itself that gives birth to new ideas. Desire drives the work forward, as I heard someone say on the radio, and that is so true.”

Via fidelisundqvist.com

Sundqvist-1 Sundqvist-2

This is some superhero art like we’ve never seen. Macedonia-based designer/illustrator/artist Marko Manev’s black and white depictions of select superheros really capture something special. While we’ve all seen appropriately colorful superhero portrayals, this series explores a darker side, and with phenomenal results. We really love his style, which is a refreshing departure from typical fan art. Iconic scenes in this stirring series feature Batman, Hulk, Captain America, Spider-Man, Silver Surfer, Thor, Iron Man, Superman, Dr. Manhattan, and Wolverine. If you’re interested in purchasing prints, Manev seems to be selling limited edition prints every so often (they sell out quick!).

Via markomanev.com and Facebook

Manev-01 Manev-02 Manev-03 Manev-04 Manev-05 Manev-06 Manev-07 Manev-08 Manev-09 Manev-10 Manev-11

For this fun series of photos, London-based fashion photographer Linus Morales recreated luxury brand logos using food (and without the use of Photoshop). Featured are Chanel sausage links, Louis Vuitton toast, Fendi fish sticks, and Gucci-branded meat. Not sure if this is some sort of commentary about our relationship with food and fashion, but at the very least makes for some engaging photography.

Via Behance

%d bloggers like this: